Heroin may be the most addicting drug, and it's a growing problem

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Heroin Might Be the Most Addicting Drug, and It's a Growing Problem

Heroin is reportedly one of the most addicting substances in the world.

That's according to a popular study from 2007 published in The Lancet. It examined dependence and other factors.

SEE ALSO: Teen accused of impersonating a medical doctor arrested again

Heroin, an opiate, raises the level of dopamine in the brain, and dopamine is one of four chemicals responsible for happiness.

Over half a million Americans tried heroin in 2013 — a 150 percent increase in about six years.

In 2013, more than 8,000 people in the U.S. died from heroin overdoses.

Cocaine, street methadone, barbiturates and alcohol rank high with causing dependence, right after heroin.

Related: One Massachusetts town's new approach on tackling the heroin epidemic:

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Heroin addict amnesty in Gloucester, Mass.
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Heroin may be the most addicting drug, and it's a growing problem
GLOUCESTER, MA - SEPTEMBER 3: Marty Ginivan, an 'angel' volunteering with the police department in Gloucester, Mass., helps move drug addicts into recovery as part of its Angel Program. The program gives addicts the chance to turn in all the drugs they have on themselves in exchange for amnesty for any crimes as long as they agree to go into treatment. Ginivan is photographed Thursday, September 3, 2015, at the Gloucester Police Department. (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 - Gloucester Massachusetts on August 31, 2015. A man walks on Main Street and Hancock street downtown. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 - The Western Harbor in Gloucester Massachusetts served as a backdrop for a candle light vigil for people who had died of an overdose on August 31, 2015. The bags had messages written on them from friends and family members. They were held down with sand and a single glow stick was dropped inside. The rally was held on National Overdose Awareness Day. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 -Collette D'Amico is hugged by Maureen Cavanagh before the start of the vigil in Gloucester Massachusetts. Collette's son Derek died of an overdose. He was 23. The vigil was for people who had died of an overdose. The bags had messages written on them from friends and family members. They were held down with sand and a single glow stick was dropped inside. The rally was held on National Overdose Awareness Day. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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