Senate Democratic leader: Trump a 'monster' spawned by US Republicans

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Is Donald Trump Unstoppable?

WASHINGTON, March 2 (Reuters) - U.S. Republicans have only themselves to blame for Donald Trump, a "monster" spawned by their constant partisan opposition to all major Obama administration initiatives, Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid said on Wednesday.

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"Republicans created him (Trump) by spending seven years appealing to some of the darkest forces in America," said Reid. He spoke on the floor of the U.S. Senate a day after presidential candidate Trump won a string of primary contests and consolidated his status as front-runner to be the Republican nominee in the November election.

Trump's rise has alarmed many establishment Republicans, who are both critical of his positions and skeptical he can win the White House. Reid, known for occasionally delivering controversial statements on the Senate floor, said Trump was now the Republican standard-bearer, but he could destroy the party.

"The reality is that Republican leaders are reaping what they've sown," Reid said, recounting seven years' worth of staunch Republican opposition to Obama's initiatives.

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Senate Democratic leader: Trump a 'monster' spawned by US Republicans
Voters gather for the Democratic presidential caucus at North High School in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Colorado voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Colorado is one of a dozen states holding 'Super Tuesday' presidential caucuses or primaries. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 01: Poll workers verify voters' photo indentification cards before they are allowed to cast a ballot inside the Arlington County Fire Station 10 during Super Tuesday voting March 1, 2016 in Arlington, Virginia. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Virginia, one of a dozen states holding presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
TAYLORSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: A Georgia voter leaves Taylorsville Town Hall after voting on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Taylorsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
Voters participate in the Democratic presidential caucus at North High School in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Colorado voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Colorado is one of a dozen states holding 'Super Tuesday' presidential caucuses or primaries. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN- MARCH 1: Caucus goers cast their vote at a Democratic party caucus site at Jefferson Community School on Super Tuesday, March 1, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. High turnout has caused long lines and wait times for voters all around Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN- MARCH 1: Caucus goers wait in line to cast their vote at a Democratic party caucus site at Jefferson Community School on Super Tuesday, March 1, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. High turnout has caused long lines and wait times for voters all around Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
WHITE, GA - MARCH 01: 81-year-old Helen Free, left, a polling site assistant manager, takes a lunch break while two Georgia voters fill out voting paper work before casting their ballots on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in White, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
ADAIRSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: 'I'm a Georgia Voter' stickers sit in a basket at a fire station on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Adairsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
MIDDLEBURY, VT - MARCH 01: People vote at a polling station on March 1, 2016 in Middlebury, Vermont. Thousands of Americans across the country are participating in Super Tuesday, the biggest day of the 2016 primary season. Thirteen states and one territory are participating in Super Tuesday: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Wyoming and American Samoa. This years election, with strong candidates on both the left and the right, is shaping up to be one of the most exciting and divisive in recent history. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SHOAL CREEK, AL - MARCH 1: Mike Maroney, of Shoal Creek, wears an 'I Voted' sticker during the Super Tuesday election at the Shoal Creek Community Center March 1, 2016 in Shoal Creek, Alabama. The rural center has about 70 voters and most had voted before lunch time. 13 states and American Samoa are holding presidential primary elections, with over 1400 delegates at stake. (Photo by Hal Yeager/Getty Images)
TAYLORSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: Edna Martinez wears a 'I'm a Georgia Voter' sticker after casting her ballot at Taylorsville Town Hall on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Taylorsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
FORT WORTH, TX - MARCH 1: Voters line up to cast their ballots on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas. 13 states and American Samoa are holding presidential primary elections, with over 1400 delegates at stake. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)
Signs are seen on a chair to assist voters at Centreville High School in Centreville, Virginia March 1, 2016, during the Super Tuesday primary voting. Voters in a dozen states will take part in 'Super Tuesday' -- a series of primaries and caucuses in states ranging from Alaska to Virginia, with Virginia the first to open its polling stations at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
John Echeverria uses the new automatic voting machine at a polling station in Strafford, Vermont, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 01: Poll workers verify voters' photo indentification cards before they are allowed to cast a ballot inside the Arlington County Fire Station 10 during Super Tuesday voting March 1, 2016 in Arlington, Virginia. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Virginia, one of a dozen states holding presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
I Voted stickers rest on a voting machine at a polling station in Strafford, Vermont, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MONTAGUE, MA - MARCH 01: Poll workers use a manual, crank operated, ballot box to collect ballots on March 01, 2016 in Montague, MA. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Massachusetts, one of a dozen states holding Super Tuesday presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images)
Voters stand in line to await voting at the McGee Community Center on March 1, 2016 in Conway, Arkansas. Americans began voting in the crucial Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in what is deemed the most critical day in the presidential nominating process. The first state to open its polling stations was Virginia at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Voter stickers are seen on a desk at the McGee Community Center on March 1, 2016 in Conway, Arkansas. Americans began voting in the crucial Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in what is deemed the most critical day in the presidential nominating process. The first state to open its polling stations was Virginia at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks into the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A voter marks his ballot at the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A 'Polling Place' sign stands outside the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A stack of 'I voted' stickers are seen March 1, 2016, at one of the Virginia primary election polling stations at Colin Powell Elementary School, in Centreville, Virginia. Voters in a dozen states will take part in 'Super Tuesday' -- a series of primaries and caucuses in states ranging from Alaska to Virginia, with Virginia the first to open its polling stations at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Republicans had decided from the start of Obama's presidency in 2009 that he was an "illegitimate" president, said Reid, who is retiring at the end of this year.

Democrat Obama, the first African-American president, is in the final year of his second four-year term. His presidency has been marked by bitter battles with Republicans over fiscal affairs, a landmark law to expand healthcare coverage for the uninsured, immigration, banking reform and policies to tackle climate change.

Republicans have controlled the House of Representatives since 2011. And while they took control of the Senate in 2015, they previously used their minority status deftly to challenge Obama.

Some Republicans, such as Senator Lindsey Graham, have been outspoken in their opposition to Trump as the prospective party nominee, saying the New York billionaire' s inflammatory rhetoric will lead to defeat in the general election.

Nonetheless, Trump, 69, now looks near unstoppable to be the Republican running against the eventual Democratic presidential candidate - most likely Hillary Clinton.

Among Trump's more controversial proposals have been his call for a wall along the entire southwestern U.S. border to keep out Mexican immigrants.

When Congress was attempting to pass a comprehensive immigration bill in 2013 and 2014, many Republican lawmakers put the brakes on the measure, instead calling for tough border enforcement only.

"Now it's time for Republicans to undo what they've done by denouncing Donald Trump," Reid said. "Trump is the GOP's Frankenstein monster. If the Republicans fail to stop Donald Trump, he'll tear the party apart even more than it is now."

(Reporting by Richard Cowan; Editing by Eric Beech and Frances Kerry)

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