Twin bombings claimed by Islamic State kill dozens in Syria's Homs

As Syria Ceasefire Looms, 46 Killed in Homs Blasts

Twin car bomb blasts killed at least 57 people in Syria's Homs on Sunday, a monitoring group said, in an attack claimed by Islamic State.

At least 100 others were injured in the attack in the central Zahra district of the western city, the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

Footage from pro-Damascus television channels showed charred corpses buried by rubble, damage to shop fronts and debris littering a wide area. Plumes of smoke rose from burning cars and wounded people walked around dazed.

Click through images from the Syria bombings here:

10 PHOTOS
Twin bombings claimed by Islamic State kill dozens in Syria's Homs
See Gallery
Twin bombings claimed by Islamic State kill dozens in Syria's Homs
Syrians inspect the damage at the site of a double car bomb attack in the Al-Zahraa neighborhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on February 21, 2016. Homs city is almost completely controlled by the Syrian government, and has regularly been targeted in bomb attacks. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Syrians gather at the site of a double car bomb attack in the Al-Zahraa neighbourhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on February 21, 2016. Homs city is almost completely controlled by the Syrian government, and has regularly been targeted in bomb attacks. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Syrians gather at the site of a double car bomb attack in the Al-Zahraa neighbourhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on February 21, 2016. Homs city is almost completely controlled by the Syrian government, and has regularly been targeted in bomb attacks. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
Syrian firefighters spray water on burning car at the site of a double car bomb attack in the Al-Zahraa neighborhood of the central Syrian city of Homs on February 21, 2016. Homs city is almost completely controlled by the Syrian government, and has regularly been targeted in bomb attacks. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on February 21, 2016 shows damaged cars at the site of a double car bomb attack in the Al-Zahraa neighborhood of the central Syrian city of Homs. Homs city is almost completely controlled by the Syrian government, and has regularly been targeted in bomb attacks. / AFP / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
Syrians gather at the site of a series of attacks the area of the Sayyida Zeinab shrine south of Syria's capital Damascus on February 21, 2016. At least 30 people were killed in a series of attacks, including a car bombing, near a Shiite shrine south of Syria's capital, state television and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. / AFP / YOUSSEF KARWASHAN (Photo credit should read YOUSSEF KARWASHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Syrian government security forces inspect the site of a series of attacks the area of the Sayyida Zeinab shrine south of Syria's capital Damascus on February 21, 2016. At least 30 people were killed in a series of attacks, including a car bombing, near a Shiite shrine south of Syria's capital, state television and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. / AFP / YOUSSEF KARWASHAN (Photo credit should read YOUSSEF KARWASHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Syrian red crescent ambulance arrives to evacuate wounded from the area of the Sayyida Zeinab shrine south of Syria's capital Damascus on February 21, 2016, after a series of attacks, targetted the Shiite shrine area. At least 30 people were killed in a series of attacks, including a car bombing, near a Shiite shrine south of Syria's capital, state television and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. / AFP / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Syrians gather at the site of a series of attacks the area of the Sayyida Zeinab shrine south of Syria's capital Damascus on February 21, 2016. At least 30 people were killed in a series of attacks, including a car bombing, near a Shiite shrine south of Syria's capital, state television and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. / AFP / YOUSSEF KARWASHAN (Photo credit should read YOUSSEF KARWASHAN/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

State television said at least 32 people had been killed.

Islamic State claimed responsibility for the two car bombs through Amaq, a news agency that supports the militant group.

A bomb attack claimed by Islamic State last month in Homs killed at least 24 people as government forces took back some Islamic State-held villages in Aleppo province in the north.

Sunday's attacks also came a day after government advances against Islamic State.

A bomb attack killed 32 people in Homs in December after a ceasefire deal paved the way for the government to take over the last rebel-controlled area of the city, which was a center of the 2011 uprising against President Bashar al-Assad.

Violence rages on unabated across the country as world powers and the United Nations push to end the five-year-old conflict, meeting in Geneva to try to broker a ceasefire.

Peace talks were suspended almost immediately earlier this month as Syrian government forces and their allies, backed by Russian air strikes, intensified assaults against insurgents in Aleppo province.

The latest fighting in the north of the country has displaced tens of thousands of people, many of whom headed for the Turkish border. The exodus added to more than 11 million already displaced by the conflict, which has claimed 250,000 lives.

More from AOL.com:
Mississippi police officer killed, three wounded after standoff
El Faro captain's pleas for help before ship sank played at hearing
2 NYPD officers shot after early morning foot chase

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.