Los Angeles hospital paid hackers $17,000 ransom in bitcoins

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Hospital Pays Hackers' Bitcoin Ransom for Hijacked Patient Records

(Reuters) -- The president of Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center said on Wednesday that his hospital paid hackers a ransom of $17,000 in bitcoins to regain control of their computer systems after a cyber attack.

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Allen Stefanek said in a statement that paying the ransom was the "quickest and most efficient way" of regaining access to the affected systems, which were crippled on Feb. 5 and interfered with hospital staff's ability to communicate electronically.

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Los Angeles hospital paid hackers $17,000 ransom in bitcoins
BRUCE LIVERPOOL is a paramedic for the LA Fire Dept, working this shift out of fire station 27; working the day/night shift on Oct 28. On this particular call, paramedics Maria Franquiz (NOT PICTURED) and transported her to Queen of Angeles/Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center. Liverpool assists Lydia Franquiz toa chair in the hallway of the emergency room, as her daughter awaits treatment. (Photo by Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi talks with Los Angeles Fire Dept paramedics Robert Gilmer, left, and Ed Gallagher before start of a press conference on Monday Dec. 19, 2005, in front of the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center Emergency Room Entrance in Hollywood where he announced his approval of the $9.2 billion proposed acquisition of PacifiCare Life and Health Insurance Company by UnitedHealth Group. (Photo by Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 28: A Los Angeles Fire Department paramedic unit leaves Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center early Wednesday morning, Jan. 28, 2004 in the Hollywood area of Los Angeles, California. Tenet Healthcare Corp., the hospital chain whose billing practices are being investigated by the U.S. government, said it will sell 27 of its 100 hospitals - including Hollywood Presbyterian - and take a $1.4 billion charge to focus on more profitable facilities. (Photo by Susan Goldman/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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Stefanek said there was no evidence that any patient or employee information was accessed in the so-called malware attack, and that the hospital fully restored access to its electronic medical record system this Monday.

"Patient care has not been compromised in any way," Stefanek said.

Stefanek said the attack locked them out of their systems by encrypting files for which only the hackers had the decryption key. He said the hospital notified law enforcement and computer experts worked feverishly to restore system access and uncover the source.

The origin of the computer network intrusion remains unknown but it bogged down communications between physicians and medical staff who suddenly became had to rely on paper records and doctors' notoriously messy handwriting, according to doctors and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

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Los Angeles hospital paid hackers $17,000 ransom in bitcoins
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Although the cyber attack snarled the hospital's patient database, doctors managed to relay necessary medical records the old-fashioned way through phone lines and fax machines, said Dr. Rangasamy Ramanathan, a neonatal-perinatal specialist affiliated with the 434-bed facility.

The FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department are working to pinpoint the hacker or hackers responsible for the intrusion, FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said on Wednesday.

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