Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?

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Could Sandra Day O'Connor Fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court Vacancy?

It's been more than a decade since Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement from the Supreme Court, but there's talk the 85-year-old former justice could fill the void left by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

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An op-ed in The Baltimore Sun laid out the case for appointing O'Connor, including her age and political history:

"Republican leaders routinely tout President Reagan as an icon; a vote against confirming Justice O'Connor would be an admission that the patron saint of the modern Republican Party wasn't infallible."

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Potential replacements for Justice Scalia, SCOTUS
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Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?

Sri Srinivasan, Federal appeals court judge

(United States Department of Justice)

District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

(Photo via the United States District Court for the District of Columbia)

Loretta Lynch, the current U.S. Attorney General. 

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Paul Watford, currently a U.S. circuit judge for the Ninth Circuit.

(Photo by Bill Clark/Getty Images)

Jacquline Nguyen, the first Vietnamese American woman named to the state court in California.

(Photo by Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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The conservative-leaning O'Connor -- the first female Supreme Court justice -- was nominated to the court by Ronald Reagan in 1981. Though that doesn't mean she falls fully in line with modern Republicans.

Senate Republicans say the next president, not Obama, should appoint the next justice.

"One more liberal justice and we will see our fundamental rights taken away," GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz said in a FOX News interview.

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But in an exclusive interview with KSAZ, O'Connor disagreed.

"I don't agree. I think we need somebody there, now, to do the job. Let's get on with it," O'Connor told KSAZ.

In the same interview, O'Connor said the idea of Obama appointing her to serve a few years wasn't logical.

RELATED: Sandra Day O'Connor through the years

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Sandra Day O'Connor through the years
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Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?
PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 16: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (Ret.) Sandra Day O'Connor poses before receiving the prestigious Anam Cara Award at the Irish Cultural Center on January 16, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Mike Moore/WireImage)
circa 1970: Supreme Court Judge Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to achieve the office, appointed by President Ronald Reagan. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
US jurist Sandra Day O'Connor is sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a confirmation hearing on her selection as a justice of the US Supreme Court. (Photo by Keystone/Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC -- SEPTEMBER 25: Newly appointed Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor stands in front of the US Supreme Court Building following her being sworn in, September 25, 1981, in Washington, DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images).
Portrait of Sandra Day O'Connor, Assoiciate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Washington, DC, December 3, 1993. (Photo by Ron Sachs/CNP/Getty Images)
384802 07: (FILE PHOTO) This undated file photo shows Justice Sandra Day O''Connor of the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, DC. (Photo by Liaison)
390456 01: Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O''Connor and her husband John O''Connor leave the receiving line at the annual Opera Ball June 8, 2001 at the Swedish Embassy in Washington, DC. (Photo by Karin Cooper/Getty Images)
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee Full committee hearing on 'Ensuring Judicial Independence Through Civics Education' on July 25, 2012 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/ Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/GettyImages)
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