Donald Trump's closing message to New Hampshire: Vote even if you're dying or your wife is leaving you

Trump Shocks in Final New Hampshire Rally

Real-estate tycoon Donald Trump gave a big speech in Manchester, New Hampshire, on the eve of the state's influential Republican presidential primary.

Trump, repeating a line he has given before, jokingly urged voters to get out and vote for him even if they are sick or facing a potential divorce.

SEE ALSO: Michael Bloomberg confirms: I'm thinking about running for president

"You have to get out and you have to vote no matter what," Trump told an arena full of supporters Monday night.

Check out Trump's latest wild event:

5 PHOTOS
Donald Trump's Iowa Rally at the same time as GOP debate
See Gallery
Donald Trump's closing message to New Hampshire: Vote even if you're dying or your wife is leaving you
Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally raising funds for US military veterans at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa on January 28, 2016. US Republicans scrambling to win the first contest in the presidential nomination race were gearing for battle at high-profile debate in Iowa, but frontrunner Donald Trump is upending the campaign by defiantly refusing to attend. Trump's gamble has left the presidential race in uncharted waters just days before Iowans vote on February 1, insisting he will not back down in his feud with debate host Fox News.Instead, the billionaire has doubled down, hosting a rogue, rival event for US military veterans at the same time that his own party is showcasing its candidates for president to all-important Iowa voters. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, waves during a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters, left, are confronted by supporters during a campaign event for Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"I say it all the time. If you're sick. If you're really like you can't move. You're close to death," he said. "Your doctor tells you it's not working. Your wife is disgusted with you. She said, 'I'm leaving.' [Vote] no matter what. She says, 'Darling, I love you, but I've fallen in love with another man.'"

Trump declared: "I don't give a damn! You got to get out to vote."

The Republican front-runner said his wife, Melania Trump, was not a fan of him saying that line at his rallies. She soon joined the candidate on stage and urged voters to help make America great again, his campaign theme.

"Oh, My wife doesn't like it when I say that," he mused. "She says, 'You shouldn't say that.' But that's OK."

Tuesday's Republican primary in New Hampshire is set to be a high-stakes event with the potential to shape the the race. A number of the establishment-oriented candidates ignored last week's Iowa caucuses in order to exclusively focus on the Granite State.

NOW WATCH: Shockingly common misconceptions about Islam

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Donald Trump went on a day-long assault of Jeb Bush on the eve of the next all-important primary

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.