IRS computer systems suffering 'hardware failure' during tax season

IRS Computer Systems Suffering 'Hardware Failure' During Tax Season

Today was a really bad day for computer screens to go dark for the Internal Revenue Service. Well actually, any day between Jan. 19 and April 18would be a bad day for that to happen.

SEE ALSO: Steps to take now to make filing your income taxes easier

The IRS reported a "hardware failure" Wednesday afternoon. It didn't explain how or why the problem occurred, only that it affected several systems including the online filing system.

The "Where's My Refund" feature on the site also went down, so you over-achievers who have already filed and are tracking your return, you'll have to check your mailbox for the time being.

Ways to avoid a tax audit:
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IRS computer systems suffering 'hardware failure' during tax season

Double check your figures to assure there are no mistakes

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Be sure to be 100% honest, and report your numbers realistically

(Photo via Alamy)

Those in the highest and lowest income brackets are most often targets of fraud, and thus, audits

(Photo by Gary Conner via Getty Images)

Don't draw too much attention with unusual or unrealistic deductions

(Photo by Rita Maas via Getty Images)

Filing returns electronically drastically reduces errors

(Photo via Alamy)

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The IRS assures taxpayers can still prepare their returns as normal, but it just can't accept electronic returns for now.

There's no word on when the system might be fixed, but we're guessing whoever the IRS brings in will probably be feeling the pressure to solve the problem fast.

This video includes images from Getty Images.

RELATED: Important tax dates to know
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IRS computer systems suffering 'hardware failure' during tax season

January 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Tetra Images/Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Individual tax returns are due for the 2015 tax year

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: Requests for an extension on filling out your taxes must be filed by this date

(Photo by Chris Fertnig via Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have first-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: This date is also the deadline to make a contribution to an IRA account for 2015

(Photo by Garry L., Shutterstock)

June 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

September 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

October 17, 2016: 2015 tax returns that received an extension are due by this date

(Photo by Juan Camilo Bernal via Getty Images)

October 17, 2016: Today is the last chance to recharacterize a traditional IRA that was converted to a Roth IRA during 2015

(Photo via Getty Images)

January 15, 2017: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo by Pascal Broze via Getty Images)

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