Trump: I will 'probably' sue because Ted Cruz cheated in Iowa

Ted Cruz Upsets Donald Trump in Iowa GOP Nomination

After accusing Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) of "illegally" stealing a win from the Iowa caucuses, Donald Trump said Wednesday that he'll "probably" sue over the results of the vote.

Trump said this in an interview on Boston Herald Radio, that was flagged by BuzzFeed.

When asked if he would file a formal complaint over the caucuses' results, Trump replied, "probably."

"What [Cruz] did is unthinkable," Trump said, later stating that Cruz was a "really fraudulent" character.

Earlier in the day, Trump fired off a raging tweetstorm accusing Cruz of cheating in Iowa. Trump even suggested the Republican Party take the unprecedented step of holding a do-over election in Iowa or nullifying Cruz's results.

See images of Donald Trump's Iowa rally:

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Donald Trump's Iowa Rally at the same time as GOP debate
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Trump: I will 'probably' sue because Ted Cruz cheated in Iowa
Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally raising funds for US military veterans at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa on January 28, 2016. US Republicans scrambling to win the first contest in the presidential nomination race were gearing for battle at high-profile debate in Iowa, but frontrunner Donald Trump is upending the campaign by defiantly refusing to attend. Trump's gamble has left the presidential race in uncharted waters just days before Iowans vote on February 1, insisting he will not back down in his feud with debate host Fox News.Instead, the billionaire has doubled down, hosting a rogue, rival event for US military veterans at the same time that his own party is showcasing its candidates for president to all-important Iowa voters. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, waves during a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Protesters, left, are confronted by supporters during a campaign event for Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016. Trump, according to a flurry of early-state and national polls, is the overwhelming favorite of self-identified moderate and liberal Republican voters. Among more conservative voters, he often trails his chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Trump's claims of fraud center around the actions of Cruz allies on the night of Monday's Iowa caucuses.

A third Republican candidate, Ben Carson, had reportedly signaled that he was going to speak early that night in order to fly home to Florida and rest. This was a somewhat unusual declaration as most candidates were planning to rush to the next primary states.

Some Cruz supporters quickly speculated that Carson was about to leave the race. Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), a prominent Cruz surrogate, wrote on Twitter: "Carson looks like he is out. Iowans need to know before they vote. Most will go to Cruz, I hope."

Cruz later apologized to Carson and said his team should have circulated Carson's statement denying the rumors.

The Texas senator ultimately won the caucuses despite the fact that Trump had been leading polls for weeks before the voting started. In his Wednesday interview with Boston Herald Radio, posted by BuzzFeed, Trump blamed his loss on Cruz picking up voters who thought Carson had dropped out.

"It's a total voter fraud when you think of it and he picked up a lot of those votes and that's why the polls were so wrong, because of that," Trump said. "I couldn't understand why the polls were wrong."

Trump also called Cruz a "nasty guy" and said "nobody likes him," noting that his colleagues in the Senate have not endorsed him for president.

Here's the full audio of the interview:

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