'Nice': Donald Trump breaks Twitter silence after Iowa loss, lashes out at media

Trump Breaks His Silence After Iowa Loss

On Tuesday, real-estate mogul Donald Trump broke a relatively uncharacteristic Twitter silence to tout his performance in the Iowa caucuses the night before.

"My experience in Iowa was a great one. I started out with all of the experts saying I couldn't do well there and ended up in 2nd place. Nice," he wrote.

Trump, who is well known for late-night tweets, had been silent on the social-media platform since his loss.

Click through images from the 2016 Iowa Caucus:

14 PHOTOS
Iowa Caucus Election 2016, people voting
See Gallery
'Nice': Donald Trump breaks Twitter silence after Iowa loss, lashes out at media
Caucus voters register as they arrive at a Democratic Party Caucus at Jackson Township Fire Station on February 1, 2016 in Keokuk, Iowa. Republican Senator Ted Cruz bumped billionaire Donald Trump from the top spot and Democrat Hillary Clinton faced a fierce challenge as Iowans voted in the first nominating contest of the 2016 White House race. / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Mike Short (R), a Hillary Clinton caucus chairperson, speaks to undecided voters at a Democratic Party Caucus at Jackson Township Fire Station on February 1, 2016 in Keokuk, Iowa. After months of fierce campaigning, Iowans take the first steps in deciding which candidate will receive their respective party nomination for the US presidency. / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Caucus attendees sign in as they arrive at a Democratic Party Caucus at Jackson Township Fire Station on February 1, 2016 in Keokuk, Iowa. After months of fierce campaigning, Iowans take the first steps in deciding which candidate will receive their respective party nomination for the US presidency. / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Caucus attendees listen during a Democratic Party Caucus at Jackson Township Fire Station on February 1, 2016 in Keokuk, Iowa. After months of fierce campaigning, Iowans take the first steps in deciding which candidate will receive their respective party nomination for the US presidency. / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump watch as the first poll numbers come in to the Trump Caucus Watch Party in West Des Moines, Iowa, February 1, 2016. Iowans started voting in the opening test of the US presidential race, with Republican Donald Trump looking to capitalize on his stunning campaign success and Hillary Clinton defending her status as the Democratic favorite. / AFP / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Ballots are counted following the Republican party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Ballots are counted following the Republican party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Roxanne Nikkel (L) changes her voter registration to Democrat on the back of her husband, Corey Nikkel, so she can attend the Democratic party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Abigail Kemp hangs signs in support of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders ahead of the party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Democratic caucus-goers wait to sign in ahead of the party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Kathi Phillips, the precinct leader for Hillary Clinton, hangs a sign directing Democratic caucus-goers in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
WEST DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 1: Helen Liu (L) and her son Chad Wang, both first-time caucus-goers, register as Republicans ahead of the party caucus in precinct 317 at Valley Church on February 1, 2016 in West Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, take place today. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures to his supporters after finishing second in the Iowa Caucus, in West Des Moines, Iowa, February 1, 2016. Republican Senator Ted Cruz has won the Iowa caucuses -- the first vote in the US presidential race -- in a tight contest with frontrunner Donald Trump and Senator Marco Rubio, US media projections showed. / AFP / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Politico even featured a clock on its website counting the seconds since Trump last tweeted.

The billionaire businessman was the front-runner going into the Iowa caucuses, with every recent poll giving him a lead over Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). Cruz ultimately upset Trump and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida) also did better than expected to place a close third.

In the days leading up to Monday's caucuses, Trump sounded confident that he would win and frequently stated how badly he wanted to do so. However, Iowa was also consistently one of Trump's worst states relative to his rivals, according to public-opinion polls.

Trump attempted to reframe his Iowa loss on Tuesday as a win despite the fact that he was viewed as the front-runner there:

NOW WATCH: A North Korean defector tells us how she escaped and survived

More from Business Insider:

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.