A few very bad cops are costing the Chicago Police Department tens of millions of dollars

Chicago Police Officers Racked Up $34 Million in Lawsuits

The Chicago Police Department has a few bad eggs — very expensive ones. On a force of 12,000 officers, 124 people represent one-third, or $34 million, of all misconduct settlements brought against the department since 2009, the Chicago Tribune reports.

SEE ALSO:Hundreds turn out for debate over high school mascot

Most are not high-profile misconduct cases, but the behavior they detail is ugly: using racial slurs, injuring cuffed suspects during traffic stops, making false arrests.

The Tribune's review found that many such cases started with a traffic stop, marijuana possession, or resisting arrest. Eighty-five percent of the cases the city has settled since 2009 were for less than $100,000, and just 5 percent topped $1 million.

These small claims manage to keep the police out of public view, because if a lawsuit goes over $100,000, it has to be reviewed by the local alderman.

Most Chicago cops appear to be good at their jobs: 82 percent of them were not associated with any payouts over the last six years. But the problem officers can really pile them on: A couple have had seven lawsuits against them since 2009.

Related: See protests in Chicago following a police related shooting:

8 PHOTOS
Protests in Chicago following Laquan McDonald shooting by police conviction
See Gallery
A few very bad cops are costing the Chicago Police Department tens of millions of dollars
Protesters form a line and walk holding signs that spell out 'Laquan' following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015, in Chicago. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
Protesters take to the streets in Chicago following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators confront police during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Police stand guard as demonstrators march through downtown during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Bus passengers watch as demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The Tribune review found that a lot of these officers run in tight groups, and some continue to receive awards from the department for their service. Police officials usually blame tough beats for high numbers of lawsuit claims.

"The department needs to do a better job identifying officers with problematic behavior to hold them accountable and restore trust in the police," said Police Spokesman Anthony Guigliemi.

A newly formed Task Force on Police Accountability will be instituting an "early intervention system" to try identifying troublesome cops before a bad encounter happens.

More from AOL.com:
Ohio police officer raises money to have K-9 retired with him
Blizzard warnings blanket Plains, Midwest; forecasters predict up to 18 inches of snow
1 dead as severe weather targets the South, California

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.