North Korea says it has invented hangover-free alcohol

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Scientists in North Korea claim they have created what is arguably one of the most sought-after drinks: hangover-free alcohol.

The country's state-run news outlet Pyongyang Times claims the ginseng-based Koryo liquor, miraculously, won't cause a hangover due to a new production method.

Koryo liquor, which the report describes as "suave," contains between 30 and 40 percent alcohol and has been around for years — though it's reserved for the country's elite.

But the producer, Taedonggang Foodstuff Factory, has reportedly made several tweaks to the original recipe that North Korea says made the liquor hangover-free. After years of research, the factory switched its production method to using "boiled and scorched glutinous rice instead of sugar."

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North Korea says it has invented hangover-free alcohol
This picture taken by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on December 12, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un celebrating the launch of the Unha-3 rocket, carrying the satellite Kwangmyongsong-3, at the general satellite control and command center in Pyongyang. Hundreds of thousands of North Korean soldiers and civilians rallied on December 14 in the centre of Pyongyang for a mass celebration of the country's long-range rocket launch, state television showed. (Photo by KNS via AFP/Getty Images)
This undated picture released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on January 12, 2014 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (C) inspecting the command of Korean People's Army (KPA) Unit 534. (Photo by KNS via AFP/Getty Images)
Photo provided by Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on Oct. 26, 2014, shows top leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea Kim Jong Un gives field guidance to the completed Pyongyang Baby Home and Orphanage. The facility has over 250 rooms for nursing, education, physical exercise, and treatment, as well as outdoor and indoor wading pools, parks and various amusement equipment for children. (Photo: Xinhua/KCNA/Corbis)
Photo provided by Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on Oct. 26, 2014, shows top leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea Kim Jong Un gives field guidance to the completed Pyongyang Baby Home and Orphanage. The facility has over 250 rooms for nursing, education, physical exercise, and treatment, as well as outdoor and indoor wading pools, parks and various amusement equipment for children. (Photo: Xinhua/KCNA/Corbis)
This picture taken from North Korean paper Rodong Sinmun on October 14, 2014 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (L) during an inspection tour of a newly-built housing complex in Pyongyang.  North Korea's leader Kim Jong-Un has finally resurfaced with the help of a walking stick after an unexplained and prolonged absence that fuelled rampant speculation about his health and even rumours of a coup in the nuclear-armed state. (AFP PHOTO / Rodong Sinmun)
This picture taken by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on December 12, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (lower L) celebrating with staffs from the satellite control center during the launch of the Unha-3 rocket, carrying the satellite Kwangmyongsong-3, at the general satellite control and command center in Pyongyang. North Korea's leader has ordered more satellite launches, state media said on December 14, 2012, two days after Pyongyang's long-range rocket launch triggered global outrage and UN condemnation. (Photo by KNS via AFP/Getty Images)
This undated picture, released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 17, 2013 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) inspecting the February 20 factory of the Korean People's Army (KPA), producing varieties of foodstuff at undisclosed place in North Korea. (Photo by KNS via AFP/Getty Images)
Kim Jong Un flashes his computer skills for gathered North Korean officials. (KCNA/Reuters/Corbis)
This undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 28, 2013 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un (R) inspecting the August 25 Fishery Station under the Korean People's Army (KPA) Unit 313.(Photo by KCNA via AFP/Getty Images)
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Not only does this keep the drinker from having throbbing headaches associated with overdoing it on the booze, but it also reportedly contains "essential amino acids... and vitamins."

"Koryo Liquor, which is made of six-year-old Kaesong Koryo insam, known as being highest in medicinal effect, and the scorched rice, is highly appreciated by experts and lovers as it is suave and causes no hangover," the report reads. It describes the liquor as a product that "exudes national flavour."

Unfortunately, this liquor is only sold in North Korea, so this claim is nearly impossible to verify.

But it isn't the first miracle product that North Korea has reportedly made from ginseng. In June, the secretive nation announced a newly developed drug called Kumdang-2 that supposedly treats AIDS, tuberculosis, cancer and dozens of other illnesses.

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