Don't get duped, the IRS isn't calling you

Don't Be Duped; The IRS Isn't Calling You

Tax season is here -- and so are the con artists posing as IRS agents.

It usually goes something like this: Victims are told they owe back taxes to the IRS and must pay up immediately through a debit card or wire transfer -- or face arrest.

READ MORE: Tax season begins as IRS begins to accept returns

In 2014, the Federal Trade Commission received nearly 55,000 complaints about scammers like these -- that's a 25-fold increase from complaints filed in 2013.

RELATED GALLERY: How to avoid a tax audit
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Don't get duped, the IRS isn't calling you

Double check your figures to assure there are no mistakes

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Be sure to be 100% honest, and report your numbers realistically

(Photo via Alamy)

Those in the highest and lowest income brackets are most often targets of fraud, and thus, audits

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Don't draw too much attention with unusual or unrealistic deductions

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Filing returns electronically drastically reduces errors

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Thousands have fallen for it. Since October 2013, some 5,000 people have forked over $26.5 million because of these scams.

To avoid getting scammed, keep in mind some things the IRS says it will never do. It won't call to demand immediate payment, ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone, or threaten you with the police.

The IRS will always first make contact by letter.

SEE ALSO: Important tax dates to know
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Don't get duped, the IRS isn't calling you

January 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Tetra Images/Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Individual tax returns are due for the 2015 tax year

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: Requests for an extension on filling out your taxes must be filed by this date

(Photo by Chris Fertnig via Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have first-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: This date is also the deadline to make a contribution to an IRA account for 2015

(Photo by Garry L., Shutterstock)

June 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

September 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

October 17, 2016: 2015 tax returns that received an extension are due by this date

(Photo by Juan Camilo Bernal via Getty Images)

October 17, 2016: Today is the last chance to recharacterize a traditional IRA that was converted to a Roth IRA during 2015

(Photo via Getty Images)

January 15, 2017: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo by Pascal Broze via Getty Images)

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