Ebola epidemic is officially over

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Africa's Ebola Outbreak Almost Over

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa lasted two years and killed more than 11,000 people. But now the three countries at the epicenter of the disease — Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia — have gotten the all-clear from the World Health Organization after no new infections have cropped up since November. In other words, Ebola's over, baby!

Well ... almost. The WHO cautioned that, though there are zero cases at present, "the job is not over, more flare-ups are expected and that strong surveillance and response systems will be critical in the months to come." The incubation period of the virus is 21 days, and none of the countries have had a new infection in almost double that time. But the virus can live inside some bodily fluids, specifically sperm, for months and months after someone recovers from Ebola, which means the threat of infection still lingers.

There is also no approved vaccine available for the disease just yet, though some late-stage trials are showing huge promise. But Vladimir Putin declared Wednesday, on the eve of the WHO's big announcement, that Russia had developed the most effective Ebola treatment, "higher than those drugs which until now have been used in the world." Believe it or not, people are pretty skeptical — though they're giving Russia's claims more credence than Kim Jong-un's announcement of a "miracle vaccine" for Ebola, HIV, and pretty much every deadly disease ever.

See photos from the epidemic:

18 PHOTOS
Liberia Ebola - vaccine - last updated 7/1/2015
See Gallery
Ebola epidemic is officially over
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse takes a blood sample from Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine study being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse speaks with a volunteer for the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
People walk near a sign calling for volunteers for an Ebola vaccine study at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, a suburb of Monrovia, on February 2, 2015. The first large-scale trials of two Ebola vaccines were due to begin in Liberia on February 2, the partnership conducting the research said. The vaccines contain harmless fragments of the virus that trigger an immune response, according to the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL), a collaboration between the United States and Liberia. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Mothers bring their sick children for treatment at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Life is slowly returning to normal for many Liberians, and most hospitals and clinics have re-opened as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: People await treatment in the outpatient lounge of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: People await outpatient treatment at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Health workers in protective clothing await patients in the outpatient lounge of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A placard with information on identifying Ebola symptoms lies in the outpatient waiting room of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A doctor displays Ebola vaccines to be given in the vaccine trials which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Emmanuel Lansana, 43, takes part in a briefing before becoming the first person to be injected in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Health workers in protective clothing speak with new arrivals in the outpatient waiting room of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Dr. Mike Montello, research director at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, prepares the first batch of Ebola vaccines to be given in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse takes a blood sample from Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine study being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse administers an injection to Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine trials being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana was the first of 12 people given injections, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Emmanuel Lansana, 43, takes part in a briefing before becoming the first person to be injected in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A Liberian pharmacist prepares an Ebola vaccine to be given in the vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse speaks with a volunteer for the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Still, the WHO's good news doesn't overshadow the devastation the Ebola epidemic wrought: In addition to the more than 11,000 dead, more than 28,500 were sickened by the disease. Families were torn apart, and approximately 8,000 kids lost a parent or were left orphaned. The virus dealt deep blows to the regional economy, from which it's still struggling to recover.

And despite the panic and freak-outs every time someone coughed on an airplane, the United States only saw four Ebola cases and one death — that of a Dallas man who traveled to Liberia and contracted the disease. And, as previously reported, New York's very own "Ebola doctor," Craig Spencer, is feeling fine.

More from Daily Intelligencer:
ISIS Claims Responsibility for Multiple Explosions, Shots Fired in Jakarta
Russian Official Steals Miles and Miles of Road, Sells the Parts for Money
Drug Smugglers Fail to Fool Feds by Hiding Marijuana in Fake Carrots
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

20 Folks Recall Shocking Interview Moments That Made Them NOT Want the Job 20 Folks Recall Shocking Interview Moments That Made Them NOT Want the Job
Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going
Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport Nature Gets Revenge On Safari Hunter Who Killed Elephants And Lions For Sport