$1.5 billion: Lump sum vs payout over 30 years?

Powerball: Should You Take the Lump Sum or Payout Over 30 Years?

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. -- Powerball fever is at a pitch and the jackpot continues to grow. The Hoosier Lottery announced Tuesday that the jackpot grew another $100 million and is now sitting at $1.5 billion.

There is so much excitement, the Hoosier Lottery website crashed when the jackpot hit a billion dollars. The website currently shows the winning numbers, but Hoosiers can't enter second chance drawings until traffic slows down.

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"Woah, traffic jam! It appears that lots and lots of people are trying to access the site at once!" the site tells visitors. "No worries though because you can still find updated winning numbers and jackpot information below or by downloading the Hoosier Lottery App."

Lottery officials are hoping someone hits the Powerball on Wednesday.

If you win the Powerball, should you take the lump sum or spread it out over the next 30 years?

New York based attorney Jason Kurland calls himself "The Lottery Lawyer." Based in New York, Kuland represents lottery winners all across the country and hopes to get a call this week from the Powerball winner.

If he does, he'll advise the winner to take the lump sum.

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January 2016 massive Powerball jackpot
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$1.5 billion: Lump sum vs payout over 30 years?
A woman purchases a Powerball lottery ticket at a convenience store in Washington, DC, January 7, 2016. Lottery officials predict Saturday's jackpot will reach $700 million, the largest in history. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
A sign in the window of a liquor store shows the Powerball lottery jackpot at $700 million in Washington, DC, on January 7, 2016. The largest jackpot in lottery history, a whopping $700 million, is up for grabs in the United States on Saturday, driving feverish excitement among lotto players dreaming of becoming millionaires. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - FEBRUARY 11: A Powerball lottery ticket is printed for a customer at a 7-Eleven store on February 11, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Ticket sales have caused the jackpot to grow $500 million, one of the largest in the game's history. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - FEBRUARY 11: Kirk Cook rings up a Powerball lottery ticket sale at a 7-Eleven store on February 11, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Ticket sales have caused the jackpot to grow $500 million, one of the largest in the game's history. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DUNKIRK, MD - JANUARY 06: With the Jackpot now at 500 million, Sherrie Haines sells a Powerball ticket to Robert Sweeney at the BP gas station, January 6, 2015 in Dunkirk, Maryland. People are visitingÃlottery counters across the area with hopes of hitting it big in tonights Powerball drawing. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
DUNKIRK, MD - JANUARY 06: With the Jackpot now at 500 million, Gale Call (L) and Sherrie Haines (C) sell a Powerball ticket to Mike Nastasi (R) at the BP gas station, January 6, 2015 in Dunkirk, Maryland. People are visitingÃlottery counters across the area with hopes of hitting it big in tonights Powerball drawing. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
A man purchases a Powerball lottery ticket at a liquor store in Washington, DC, January 4, 2016. Lottery officials predict the January 6 jackpot will reach $400 million, one of the largest in the game's history. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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"Even if you take the money and put it in the bank at the most secure safe investment you can have, you will make a lot more money than lottery will pay you out over time," said Kurland. "Without question, lump sum."

In this case, that's a $930 million cash value.

The only time he would advise taking the annuity option, is if you don't trust yourself. There are lottery winners that have gone broke in a short amount of time.

"People don't know how to handle this kind of wealth. It could be very dangerous," he said. "But even then I would say consult a financial planner and we can put mechanisms in place where you can't take a certain amount out."

The Hoosier Lottery says there's no shame in taking the payout over the next 30 years. Plus, the payments are nothing to sneeze at.

"The annuity option is pretty impressive," said Hoosier Lottery Spokeswoman Betsy Gutierrez. "I don't have updated figures for $1.5 billion, but at $1.4 billion your smallest check the first year, is going to be over $21 million. And every year it's gonna go up to the point that in the 30th year, you're going to get more than $80 million."

Before you spend responsibly, the Lottery reminds everyone to play responsibly.

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