El Niño storm brings high surf warnings to SoCal coast, takes out news camera

Storms Bring High Surf Warning to Southern California Coast

(KTLA) Another powerful El Niño storm brought high surf warnings to parts of the Southern California coast Thursday, and even took out a KTLA camera that got too close to one wave.

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Described as "large and damaging surf" by theNational Weather Service, waves between 15 and 20 feet, with some sets as high as 25 feet were expected to hit the Central coast Thursday; Ventura County will see 10 to 15 foot waves with sets up to 18 feet; and Santa Barbara's south coast will see surf up to 8 to 12 feet.

For Los Angeles County, waves were likely to reach 10 to 14 feet, with sets up to 16 feet before the surf begins to subside on Friday.

Images of the storm:

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El Niño storm brings high surf warnings to SoCal coast, takes out news camera

In a photo provided by Mike Eliason, Bo Sailor of Goleta, Caif. watches as high surf crashes into the wall and spills onto Channel Drive in Montecito, Calif. on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016. The ocean-water-quality advisory issued Thursday came as the latest storms moved east after pummeling the region with heavy rainfall. Bacteria levels can increase significantly during and after rainstorms as contaminants in the runoff enter the ocean via storm drains, creeks and rivers. (Mike Eliason via AP)

High surf batters the break wall at Cabrillo Beach in San Pedro, Calif., Thursday morning, Jan. 7, 2016, as another powerful El Nino-driven storm lashed coastal areas of California on Thursday. The storm created waves that forecasters said could reach 16 feet while sending scattered thundershowers across inland areas. (Chuck Bennett/Daily Breeze via AP)

SANTA PAULA, CA - JANUARY 07: A rainbow fills the sky above the Thomas Aquinas College in the Topatopa Mountains near Santa Paula Thursday afternoon January 07, 2016 as the latest El Nino storm moves through Southern California with more rain and heavy surf. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
SOLVANG, CA - DECEMBER 25: A full moon sets over a dry Santa Ynez River on December 25, 2016, in Solvang, California. Because of its close proximity to Southern California and Los Angeles population centers and Mediterranean climate, the coastal regions of Santa Barbara have become a popular weekend getaway destination for millions of tourists each year. (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images)
LONG BEACH, CA - JANUARY 07: Bitelio Ramirez, 52, looks out over tons of trash and debris has piled up near the mouth of the Los Angeles River after two days of heavy rain fell in Southern California from El Nino generated storms. Two cranes were being used to lift out somewhere around 300 tons of trash, according to a worker on the scene. (Photo by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
People stand near a sink hold caused from recent storms in San Diego, California on January 7, 2016. The first major El Nino storm of the season battered southern California this week, bringing heavy rain to the drought-stricken region and causing flooding and mudslides in some areas. Several El Nino storms are expected to hit California in the coming weeks, but experts warn that the rainfall will not be enough to help the region recover from a historic drought. AFP PHOTO/ BILL WECHTER / AFP / Bill Wechter (Photo credit should read BILL WECHTER/AFP/Getty Images)
SANTA PAULA, CA - JANUARY 07: A rainbow fills the sky in the Topatopa Mountains near Santa Paula Thursday afternoon January 07, 2016 as the latest El Nino storm moves through Southern California with more rain and heavy surf. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
A restaurant entrance is mirrored by flood waters after heavy rains in San Diego, California on January 7, 2016. The first major El Nino storm of the season battered southern California this week, bringing heavy rain to the drought-stricken region and causing flooding and mudslides in some areas. Several El Nino storms are expected to hit California in the coming weeks, but experts warn that the rainfall will not be enough to help the region recover from a historic drought. AFP PHOTO/ BILL WECHTER / AFP / Bill Wechter (Photo credit should read BILL WECHTER/AFP/Getty Images)
A City of San Diego crew member cleans up debris in a road after heavy storms and flooding in San Diego, California on January 7, 2016. The first major El Nino storm of the season battered southern California this week, bringing heavy rain to the drought-stricken region and causing flooding and mudslides in some areas. Several El Nino storms are expected to hit California in the coming weeks, but experts warn that the rainfall will not be enough to help the region recover from a historic drought. AFP PHOTO/ BILL WECHTER / AFP / Bill Wechter (Photo credit should read BILL WECHTER/AFP/Getty Images)
warning light stands submerged on the Camino de la Reina which is flooded by the San Diego River after heavy rains in San Diego, California on January 7, 2016. The first major El Nino storm of the season battered southern California this week, bringing heavy rain to the drought-stricken region and causing flooding and mudslides in some areas. Several El Nino storms are expected to hit California in the coming weeks, but experts warn that the rainfall will not be enough to help the region recover from a historic drought. AFP PHOTO/ BILL WECHTER / AFP / Bill Wechter (Photo credit should read BILL WECHTER/AFP/Getty Images)
VENTURA, CA - JANUARY 06: Homes at Mondo's Beach between the Solimar and Faria Beach communities west of Ventura have their sea walls tested Wednesday morning, January 06, 2016, as the third storm this season's El Nino moves in with more rain and heavy surf. (Photo by Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
LONG BEACH, CA. -- TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015 -- A front end loader and dump truck work to move beach sand to protect vulnerable areas from flooding in rainy weather during the first big storm in what is predicted to be a strong El Nino event in Southern California January 5, 2016. (Photo by Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
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In the meantime, high surf warnings were in effect through late Thursday for all coastal areas from San Luis Obispo County to Los Angeles County, with high surf advisories likely to still be needed on Friday.

The powerful surf was likely to cause damage to some coastal structures and cause minor coastal flooding, according to the weather service.

Officials warned the public to keep a safe distance from the surf, which could be seen crashing onto the Ventura Promenade Thursday morning.

Reporter Lynette Romero and her cameraman were setting up for a live shot on the promenade when a large wave came crashing over the rail.

The camera recorded the approaching wave before going dark as the water splashed down.

A bystander also caught the wave crashing into our camera on cellphone video.

Area residents were concerned about the Ventura Pier, which sustained damage amid heavy surf on Dec. 11.

"This is a really powerful northwest storm ... the waves are just pounding," said resident Rich Haggerty, who talked about the weakened pier.

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"How much can it take. One set after another constantly after it's been weakened ... hopefully it stays up," Haggerty said.

Several days of rain in Southern California prompted public health officials to urge beachgoers to stay out of the water and declare an ocean-water-quality rain advisory for all Los Angeles County beaches.

The advisories are issued when there is significant rainfall because contaminants within the runoff often enters the ocean, increasing bacteria levels.

The advisory was scheduled to be in effect until at least 8:30 a.m. Friday.

Dangerous rip currents and long-shore currents are also expected to be common in all areas along the coast, according to the weather service, which warned people to stay off of rocks and jetties.

"The large waves and strong currents will create a risk of ocean drowning," the weather service stated.

Inexperienced swimmers and surfers were asked to stay out of the water.

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