Why Brazil doesn't want its women to get pregnant

Why Brazil Doesn't Want Its Women to Get Pregnant

Brazil is telling women not to get pregnant. Yes, you read that right. That's because women in Brazil who've been bitten by certain mosquitoes could put their babies at risk of having a brain disorder. It's triggered by the Zika virus.

Brazil has had a problem with dengue fever in the past, which is also carried by the same mosquito. Before doctors noticed the risk of the brain disorder, there were few problems other than feverish symptoms and rashes associated with the Zika virus.

See the top 5 cities for mosquitoes:

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Why Brazil doesn't want its women to get pregnant

5. Houston, Texas

(Photo via Shutterstock)

4. Detroit, Michigan

(Photo via Getty)

3. Washington, D.C. 

(Photo: Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images)

2. Chicago, Illinois

(Photo via Getty)

1. Atlanta, Georgia

(Photo via Alamy)

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Six states in Brazil have declared a state of emergency because of the epidemic, which has infected about a million people — including hundreds of pregnant women and babies.

The disease isn't native to the South American region, and the infected mosquitoes are unlikely to spread north to the U.S. because they prefer tropical climates.

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Why Brazil doesn't want its women to get pregnant
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos A researcher examines transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos kept in cages to collect their eggs, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are kept in cages for reserachers to collect their eggs, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos A researcher examines transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos kept in cages to collect their eggs, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are kept in cages for reserachers to collect their eggs, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos A researcher collects eggs of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos A researcher collects eggs of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos, at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Larvae of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are pictured through a microscope viewfinder at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Larvae of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are pictured through a microscope viewfinder at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are seen in a container at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos are seen in containers at a laboratory of biotech company Oxitec, in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos The production supervisor of biotech company Oxitec, Sofia Bastos Pinto, looks at transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos kept in a container at the lab in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos The production supervisor of biotech company Oxitec, Sofia Bastos Pinto, looks at transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos through a microscope at the lab in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Natalia Ramos The production supervisor of biotech company Oxitec, Sofia Bastos Pinto, looks at larvae of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitos kept in trays at the lab in Campinas, 100 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 21, 2014. Oxitec produces genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue, a deadly tropical disease more prevalent in Brazil than anywhere else in the world. The factory developed a technology where eggs of Aedes aegypti receive microinjection of DNA with genes that produce a protein which prevents their offsprings from reaching adulthood and thus reducing the total population of transmitters of dengue. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
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