Divers retrieve more items in search for California shooting clues

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FBI Divers Search Lake for San Bernardino Evidence

FBI divers picked through the bottom of a San Bernardino lake on Saturday for a third day, seeking evidence related to a married couple who massacred 14 people at a holiday party, in what the bureau has called an act of terror inspired by Islamic State.

Federal Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said in an email divers retrieved objects from Seccombe Lake, as they did the previous day. But she declined to say what those were or whether they appeared to be tied to the mass shooting.

The San Bernardino lake, nestled in a public park, about 2.5 miles (4 km) north of the site of the shooting, is believed to be littered with junk and debris.

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Divers retrieve more items in search for California shooting clues
HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA - DECEMBER 12: Van Thanh Nguyen, center, mother of Tin Nguyen, 31, one of the victims of the deadly San Bernardino terrorist attack, is consoled by family members during her daughter's funeral service at the Good Shepherd Cemetery, in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Dec. 12, 2015. (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA - DECEMBER 12: Nghi Van Nguyen, grandmother of Tin Nguyen, 31, one of the victims of the deadly San Bernardino terrorist attack, weep at her casket during her funeral service in Huntington Beach, Calif., on Dec. 12, 2015. (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
SANTA ANA, CA - DECEMBER 12: Pallbearers stand guard over the casket of the slain Tin Nguyen, 31, one of the victims of the deadly San Bernardino terrorist attack, at the start of the memorial service at St. Barbara's Catholic Church, in Santa Ana, Calif., on Dec. 12, 2015. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
SANTA ANA, CA - DECEMBER 12: Community members attend the funeral for Tin Nguyen, 31, one of the victims of the deadly San Bernardino terrorist attack, at St. Barbara's Catholic Church, in Santa Ana, Calif., on Dec. 12, 2015. (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
COLTON, CA - DECEMBER 12: A woman consoles a man during a funeral service for San Bernardino shooting victim Isaac Amanios at the St. Minas Orthodox Church in Colton Saturday. (Photo by Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
SANTA ANA, CA - DECEMBER 12: San Trinh, long time boyfriend of of Tin Nguyen, holds a photo after her coffin was loaded into a hearse at her funeral held at St. Barbaras Catholic Church in Santa Ana, CA on Saturday, December 12, 2015. A heavily armed man and woman opened fire Wednesday on a holiday banquet for his co-workers, killing multiple people and seriously wounding others in a precision assault, authorities said. Hours later, they died in a shootout with police. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA - DECEMBER 12: Tram Le, center, cousin of Tin Nguyen, holds a cooler of Tin's during her burial held at Good Shepherd Cemetery in Huntington Beach, CA on Saturday, December 12, 2015. Tin Nguyen was one of 14 that died after a heavily armed man and woman opened fire Wednesday on a holiday banquet for his co-workers, killing multiple people and seriously wounding others in a precision assault, authorities said. Hours later, they died in a shootout with police. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
SANTA ANA, CA - DECEMBER 12: Family members of Tin Nguyen carry her coffin to a hearse at her funeral held at St. Barbaras Catholic Church in Santa Ana, CA on Saturday, December 12, 2015. A heavily armed man and woman opened fire Wednesday on a holiday banquet for his co-workers, killing multiple people and seriously wounding others in a precision assault, authorities said. Hours later, they died in a shootout with police. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
COLTON, CA - DECEMBER 12: The three children of San Bernardino shooting victim Isaac Amanios speak next to their fathers casket during funeral services at the St. Minas Orthodox Church in Colton Saturday. (Photo by Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
COVINA, CALIF. -- THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015: Attendees weep after seeing a hearse carrying Yvette Velasco's casket, one of the victims of the deadly San Bernardino terrorist attacks, pass by before the funeral service at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, in Covina, Calif., on Dec. 10, 2015. Yvette Velasco is survived by her parents and three sisters. (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
COVINA, CA - DECEMBER 10: Family members hug near the casket of 27-year-old Yvette Velasco at the first funeral for victims of the December 2 massacre in San Bernardino on December 10, 2015 in Covina, California. Velasco was attending a holiday luncheon at the Inland Regional Center on December 2 when Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik entered the room heavily armed and opened fire, killing 14 people and injuring 21 others. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
Family members and friends arrive before a funeral service for Yvette Velasco, killed in the December 2 mass shooting in San Bernardino, at the Forest Lawn in Covina, California on December 10, 2015. Velasco, one of the youngest victims, was at the training and holiday luncheon at the Inland Regional Center when Syed Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, barged in on the gathering and opened fire on his San Bernardino County Department of Public Health coworkers, killing 14 and injuring 22 others in what the FBI is investigating as an 'act of terrorism.' AFP PHOTO/ RINGO CHIU / AFP / RINGO CHIU (Photo credit should read RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images)
Family members, friends, and law enforcement members attend the funeral service for Yvette Velasco, killed in the December 2 mass shooting in San Bernardino, at the Forest Lawn in Covina, California on December 10, 2015. Velasco, one of the youngest victims, was at the training and holiday luncheon at the Inland Regional Center when Syed Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, barged in on the gathering and opened fire on his San Bernardino County Department of Public Health coworkers, killing 14 and injuring 22 others in what the FBI is investigating as an 'act of terrorism.' AFP PHOTO/ RINGO CHIU / AFP / RINGO CHIU (Photo credit should read RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images)
Family members, friends, and law enforcement members attend the funeral service for Yvette Velasco, killed in the December 2 mass shooting in San Bernardino, at the Forest Lawn in Covina, California on December 10, 2015. Velasco, one of the youngest victims, was at the training and holiday luncheon at the Inland Regional Center when Syed Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, barged in on the gathering and opened fire on his San Bernardino County Department of Public Health coworkers, killing 14 and injuring 22 others in what the FBI is investigating as an 'act of terrorism.' AFP PHOTO/ RINGO CHIU / AFP / RINGO CHIU (Photo credit should read RINGO CHIU/AFP/Getty Images)
COVINA, CA - DECEMBER 10: Friends and loved ones pass graveside Christmas decorations as they arrive for funeral services for 27-year-old Yvette Velasco, the first funeral for victims of the December 2 massacre in San Bernardino, on December 10, 2015 in Covina, California. Velasco was attending a holiday luncheon at the Inland Regional Center on December 2 when Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik entered the room heavily armed and opened fire, killing 14 people and injuring 21 others. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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U.S. officials have said their investigation has yet to turn up evidence that foreign militants directed Syed Rizwan Farook, 28, or Tashfeen Malik, 29, when the married pair stormed a holiday gathering of his co-workers at a regional center in San Bernardino on Dec. 2 and opened fire with assault rifles.

The couple shot dead 14 people and wounded more than 20 in a rampage the FBI said it is treating as an act of terrorism inspired by Islamic militants. If that is confirmed, it would mark the most lethal such attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001.

Farook, the U.S.-born son of Pakistani immigrants, and Malik, a Pakistani native he married last year in Saudi Arabia, were killed in a shootout with police hours after their assault in San Bernardino, 60 miles (100 km) east of Los Angeles.

CNN and other media have reported the FBI divers at the lake were looking for a computer hard drive that belonged to the couple, but Eimiller declined to confirm that.

The underwater search stemmed from leads indicating Farook and Malik had been in the vicinity of Seccombe Lake on the day of the killings, the FBI has said.

The FBI has determined that the couple declared they were acting on behalf of the Islamic State. But FBI Director James Comey has said there was no evidence the militant group controlling vast swaths of Iraq and Syria was even aware of them prior to their attack.

On Friday, a fire that appeared to have been intentionally set burned the entrance to a mosque in Southern California's Coachella Valley, some 75 miles (121 km) from San Bernardino, raising concerns of a possible reaction to the shooting.

A 23-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of arson and for committing a hate crime, according to the Riverside County Sheriff's Department, which has not said if he was motivated by the shooting in targeting the mosque.

Muslim Americans across the country have said they are worried about a backlash, as happened in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

More coverage below:

San Bernardino Suspects' Landlord: Media Rush Was a 'Garage Sale'


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