This new ISIS app brings terror straight to your cell phone

ISIS Used Encrypted Messaging App to Communicate


An ISIS-linked media group launched an Android app that allows the terror group's supporters to follow a jihadist "news" feed.

The app, discovered by Vocativ using our deep web technology, was created by the Amaq News Agency, which the SITE Intelligence Group describes as a "jihadi media unit" linked to the Islamic State. It allows users to access the agency's reports on Android devices, including updates from ISIS battles on the ground, exclusive videos from areas under Islamic State control and infographics that detail ISIS operations in Iraq and Syria.

Read More: Life Under ISIS: Woman Bashes Police Over Modesty Policy

Vocativ tried the app, which isn't available on the Google Play Store but instead is distributed by APK files that can be installed on Android-powered devices manually. It is easy to use, and appears to be easily accessible: On Twitter, at least 40 posts by ISIS loyalists have included links to download the app, indicating that it's circulating widely in online ISIS networks.

See what life looks like under the Islamic State:

26 PHOTOS
What life looks like under ISIS rule
See Gallery
This new ISIS app brings terror straight to your cell phone
A civilian woman carries her child during a battle with Islamic State militants, east of Mosul, Iraq, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
Civilians walk past Iraqi Special Operations Forces (ISOF) during a battle with Islamic State militants, east of Mosul, Iraq, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
A displaced man, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, carries a woman in the Mithaq district of eastern Mosul, Iraq, January 3, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smoke rises from clashes during a battle with Islamic State militants in the Mithaq district of eastern Mosul, Iraq, January 3, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
An Iraqi soldier is seen during a battle with Islamic State militants, north of Mosul, Iraq, December 30, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
Iraqi people flee the Islamic State stronghold in the town of Bartella, east of Mosul, December 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Iraqi people flee the Islamic State stronghold in the town of Bartella, east of Mosul, December 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Iraqi rapid response forces cook food in their headquarters during the war against the Islamic state militants east of Mosul, Iraq, December 21, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
Mohammad Hassan, whose hand was chopped off by Islamic State militants, sits outside a house at Nimrud village, south of Mosul, Iraq, December 13, 2016. Picture taken December 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
Displaced Iraqi boys, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, warm themselves by a fire in Khazer camp, Iraq,December 15, 2016.REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Displaced Iraqi woman, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, bids her relatives farewell as she leave Khazer camp to go home, Iraq December 10, 2016.REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Iraqi Christians come to visit the heavily damaged Church of the Immaculate Conception after Iraqi forces recaptured it from Islamic State in Qaraqosh, near Mosul, Iraq, December 9, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
An Iraqi father (L) mourns the death of his son, who was killed during clashes in the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, in al-Samah neighborhood, Iraq December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
An Iraqi girl, who was wounded during clashes in the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, lies on a bed at a field hospital in al-Samah neighborhood, Iraq December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
Displaced people who fled the clashes transfer to camps during a battle with Islamic State militants in Mosul, Iraq, November 30, 2016 REUTERS/Alaa Al-Marjani
A member of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces (ISOF) gestures in military vehicle during a battle with Islamic State militants in Mosul, Iraq, November 30, 2016 REUTERS/Alaa Al-Marjani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A man gestures as other men sit on the ground as an Iraqi Special forces intelligence team check their ID cards as they search for Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Two men hold hands as an Iraqi Special forces intelligence team searches for Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Oilfields burned by Islamic State fighters are seen in Qayyara, south of Mosul, Iraq November 23, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Boys stand in front of oilfields burned by Islamic State fighters in Qayyara, south of Mosul, Iraq November 23, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Civilians flee fighting between Iraqi forces and Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq, November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smoke rises from clashes during a battle with Islamic State militants at the airport of Tal Afar west of Mosul, Iraq November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A member of Shi'ite fighters carries a weapon during a battle with Islamic State militants at the airport of Tal Afar west of Mosul, Iraq November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A displaced woman from the outskirts of Mosul covers herself in a blanket in the town of Bashiqa, after it was recaptured from the Islamic State, east of Mosul, Iraq, November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
A girl attends classes after the city was recaptured from the Islamic State militants in Qayyara, Iraq, November 17, 2016. REUTERS/Ari Jalal
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The app surfaced onSunday, serving as yet another outlet for the terror group to distribute propaganda and communicate. The group already uses social media platforms including Twitter and Telegram, but faced pushback in recent weeks. Anonymous hacktivists claimed they shut down more than 11,000 ISIS-affiliated accounts. Telegram also said this month itclosed 78 accounts linked to ISIS.

While Amaq, the "news agency" boasting the app, isn't considered an unofficial ISIS media wing, Vocativ found that it has released exclusive videos showing Palmyra in Syria and Ramadi in Iraq after the cities were seized by ISIS. The agency covers only ISIS-related events and also maintains a channel on Telegram.

A screen shot showing a video feed on the new Amaq app.

The post This New ISIS App Brings Terror Straight To Your Cell Phone appeared first on Vocativ.

More on AOL.com:
At least 16 prisoners killed in Guatemala jail riot
Indonesia 'ghost villages' eerie vestiges of volcano's power
Planned Parenthood victim Ke'Arre Stewart tried to save others
Read Full Story