FBI: Two Virginia men planned to incite a 'race war' by bombing black churches


FBI Foils Alleged Plot by White Supremacists in Virginia

Yet another attempt to spark a "race war" was foiled on Sunday, when the FBI arrested two white supremacists who allegedly planned on bombing black churches and synagogues in Virginia.

Federal court documents obtained by CBS 6 detail Robert Doyle and Ronald Beasley Chaney's apparent plot: Along with several friends who believe in a white-supremacist version of the Ásatrú faith — a neopagan amalgam of Norse mythology and race "science" — Doyle and Chaney allegedly discussed bombing local black churches and synagogues, then robbing a local jeweler, an armored truck, and a gun store, according to the documents. The men would use the jewelry to purchase land, where they could "stockpile weapons and train for the coming race war."

Related: See images from the Charleston attacks:

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FBI: Two Virginia men planned to incite a 'race war' by bombing black churches
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
Photos found on a website that allegedly belongs to church shooting suspect Dylann Roof.
This image has been provided by the Charleston Police Department, Thursday, June 18, 2015. A man opened fire during a prayer meeting inside a historic black church in downtown Charleston, S.C., Wednesday night, June 17, 2015, killing nine people, including the pastor in an assault that authorities are calling a hate crime. The shooter remained at large Thursday. (Photo via Charleston Police Department)
The Emanuel AME Church is viewed behind a police vehicle on June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the Church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A police officer holds up a tape in front of the Emanuel AME Church June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A view ofthe Emanuel AME Church is seen June 18, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, after a mass shooting at the church on the evening of June 17, 2015. US police on Thursday arrested a 21-year-old white gunman suspected of killing nine people at a prayer meeting in one of the nation's oldest black churches in Charleston, an attack being probed as a hate crime. The shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the southeastern US city was one of the worst attacks on a place of worship in the country in recent years, and comes at a time of lingering racial tensions. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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That plan unraveled on October 25, when Doyle and Chaney tried to buy "an automatic weapon, explosives, and a pistol with a silencer" from an undercover FBI agent, according to local station WWBT.

Doyle and Chaney were arrested two weeks later, after attempting to collect the merchandise they ordered. A third suspect, Charles Daniel Halderman, was also arrested for conspiring to aid in the murder and subsequent robbery of a jewelry-store owner.

The threat of white-supremacist terrorism has received heightened attention in the wake of last summer's massacre at the Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. According to a count by the New America Foundation, more people have been killed on American soil by white extremists than by Muslim jihadists in the 14 years since 9/11.

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