Diamonds aren't as rare as you might think, scientists say

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Why the Diamond Industry Hasn't Lost Its Sparkle


Diamonds are a girl's best friend — but they aren't as rare as you might think, according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University.

"Diamond formation in the deep Earth, the very deep Earth, may be a more common process than we thought," Johns Hopkins geochemist Dimitri A. Sverjensky, said in a news release.
But don't expect sales at Zales just yet.
The report, published today in Nature Communications, adds that the diamonds being formed are so deep into the Earth that they're virtually inaccessible.
These diamonds "are not necessarily the stuff of engagement rings," either, the report adds. In fact, most are microscopic, measuring just a few microns in diameter.

SEE MORE:Who cares about diamonds? This man proposed with a ring made from his wisdom tooth

The discovery, however, refutes common beliefs about how diamonds form from rock.
Until now, scientists believed that diamonds are formed through a "redox" reaction involving the movement of fluid by the oxidation of methane or the chemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Oxidation results in a gain of electrons.

The recent research proved that water, as it becomes more acidic, could produce diamonds while moving from one type of rock to another.

"The more people look, the more they're finding diamonds in different rock types now," Sverjensky added. "I think everybody would agree there's more and more environments of diamond formation being discovered."

See photos of a diamond deposit in Arkansas:

7 PHOTOS
Crater of diamonds state park
See Gallery
Diamonds aren't as rare as you might think, scientists say
Brian, left, and Amber Green, right, of Ward, Arkansas, visits the Crater of Diamonds State Park with their 4-year-old daughter, Alexia. (Photo by Allen Holder/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Lucky fortune diamond hunters can find diamonds on or just below the surface at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Southwest Arkansas. (Photo by Allen Holder/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
A handful of real diamonds found at Crater of Diamonds State Park in southern Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE


More from US News:
Why do some people take stupid risks with money?
8 smart ways to invest in metal stocks
Higher education costs vary state to state

Read Full Story

Want more news like this?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from business news to personal finance tips delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

Rescuer Sees Bumps All Over This Dog's Skin - Then X-Rays Reveal The Tragic Story Rescuer Sees Bumps All Over This Dog's Skin - Then X-Rays Reveal The Tragic Story
Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going Man Suspects His Wife Is Cheating On Him - Then His Daughter Reveals What's Really Going
Don't Get Too Close To a Newborn Giraffe Unless You Want to Get Kicked in the Nuts Don't Get Too Close To a Newborn Giraffe Unless You Want to Get Kicked in the Nuts