Americans becoming less religious, especially young adults: poll

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New Poll Says Americans Are Becoming Less Religious

Americans are becoming less religious, judging by such markers as church attendance, prayer and belief in God, and the trend is more pronounced among young adults, according to a poll released on Tuesday.

The share of U.S. adults who say they believe in God, while still high compared with other advanced industrial countries, slipped to 89 percent in 2014 from 92 percent in 2007, according to the Pew Research Center's Religious Landscape Study.

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The proportion of Americans who say they are "absolutely certain" God exists fell even more, to 63 percent in 2014 from 71 percent in 2007.

The percentage of Americans who pray every day, attend religious services regularly and consider religion important in their lives are down by small, but statistically significant measures, the survey found.

See photos of religious sites across the U.S.:

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American religious architecture
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Americans becoming less religious, especially young adults: poll
Mormons' Temple in Salt Lake City, UT in the night (Photo via Getty)

Exterior of St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, New York. (Photo via Shutterstock)

Islamic Center Of America on July 17, 2014 in Dearborn, Michigan. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images)
The Baha'i House of Worship, Wilmette, Illinois, United States. (Photo by: MyLoupe/UIG via Getty Images)
Court yard of Hsi Lai Temple, Hacienda Heights, California, USA (Photo by Dee Jolie via Alamy)
Low angle view of a cathedral, National Cathedral, Washington DC, USA (Photo via Getty)
'Temple in San Diego, California' (Photo by Andrew Zarivny via Getty)
St. Louis Cathedral, view from Jackson Square, New Orleans, state of Louisiana, USA, North America (Photo by Naum Chayer via Alamy)
Details of Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Savannah, Georgia (Photo via Getty)
The Cathedral of Saint Paul sits atop Cathedral Hill in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S., on Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013. Minnesota's real GDP grew 3.5 percent in 2012 and was ranked fifth in growth after North Dakota, Texas, Oregon and Washington. Photographer: Ariana Lindquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Thorncrown Chapel is the glass church in the woods
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The trend is most pronounced among young adults, with only half of those born from 1990 to 1996 absolutely certain of their belief in God, compared to 71 percent of the "silent generation," or those born from 1928 to 1945.

Younger people also are less likely to pray daily, at 39 percent, compared to "silent generation" adults at 67 percent.

On the other hand, 77 percent of Americans continue to identify with some religious faith, and those who do are just as committed now as they were in 2007, according to the survey. Two-thirds of religiously affiliated adults say they pray every day and that religion is very important to them, the survey found.

The survey also found religious divides among the political parties, with those who are not religiously affiliated more likely to be Democrats, at 28 percent, compared to 14 percent of Republicans.

About 38 percent of Republicans identify as evangelical Protestants - the largest religious group in the party, the survey found. Catholics make up 21 percent of each major political party.

Orianna O'Neill, 21, a student at Beloit College in Wisconsin who comes from a non-religious household but sometimes prays, said she thinks the anti-science, anti-gay rhetoric of some politicians may be turning some young people away from religion.

Both the 2007 and 2014 studies surveyed more than 35,000 adults and had margins of error of less than 1 percentage point.

RELATED GALLERY: Check out photos of the faithful from Pope Francis' visit to the US:

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Pope's visit to the U.S. (Washington DC, New York, Philadelphia)
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Americans becoming less religious, especially young adults: poll
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 24: Mark Perez wears a button bearing the image of Pope Francis while waiting for him to arrive for a visit to Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington September 24, 2015, in Washington, DC. The charity serves dinner to about 300 homeless people daily at the site, and it will serve a meal during the pope's visit. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NJ - SEPTEMBER 25: Pope Francis visits Our Lady Queen of Angels School September 25, 2015 in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York City. The pope is in New York on a two-day visit carrying out a number of engagements, including a papal motorcade through Central Park and celebrating Mass in Madison Square Garden. (Photo by Kena Betancur-Pool/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 26: Pope Francis waves to the crowd gathered on the route to the Festival of Families along Benjamin Franklin Parkway on September 26, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Pope is concluding his U.S. tour by spending two days in Philadelphia, having visited Washington D.C. and New York City. (Photo by Eric Thayer-Pool/Getty Images)
WYNNEWOOD, PA - SEPTEMBER 27: Pope Francis greets seminarians as he walks the loggia to his address to the Bishops at St. Martin of Tours Chapel at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, September 27, 2015 in Wynnewwod, Pennsylvania. After visiting Washington and New York City, Pope Francis concludes his tour of the U.S. with events in Philadelphia on Saturday and Sunday. ((Photo by Tom Gralish-Pool/Getty Images)
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