USDA issues massive ground beef recall due to possible E. coli

USDA Recalls Beef Nationwide

A Nebraska meat supplier is recalling more than 167,000 pounds of ground beef due to possible E. coli contamination.

According to a press release from the USDA, the recalled meat was processed by All American Meats in Omaha and shipped nationwide.

SEE ALSO: More cases of E. coli in Washington, Oregon expected

The problem, according to the USDA, was discovered on Oct. 30 when a sample tested positive for the bacteria. So far, there have been no confirmed reports of illness connected with the recall.

Beef with the following labels should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase:

  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef 80% Lean 20% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 62100.
  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef 73% Lean 27% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 60100.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef Round 85% Lean 15% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68560.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68160.
  • 60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63130.
  • 80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of "Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)" with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63100.


See statistics from cases of E. coli deaths reported in the US:


E. coli is potentially deadly -- especially to children under 5 and senior citizens -- and causes dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps within two to eight days of exposure to the organism.

RELATED:Recent food poisoning and E. coli cases:

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USDA issues massive ground beef recall due to possible E. coli
BOSTON - AUGUST 23: Colony of E. coli cells are grown in the synthetic biology lab at Harvard Medical School in Boston on Tuesday, August 23 2011. (Photo by Wendy Maeda/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
ELIOT, ME - MAY 26: Kyler Dove, a seventh grader at Marshwood Middle School in Eliot, stops to take a drink from one of the 11,520 water bottles donated to the school Tuesday, May 26, 2015 by Cumberland Farms. Home Depot and Hannaford have also made donations to the school as it manages the current E coli scare. (Photo by Jill Brady/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
PORTLAND, OR - MAY 23: A shopper looks for bottled water on nearly empty shelves at a New Seasons Supermarket May 23, 2014 in Portland, Oregon. Oregon health officials ordered Portland to issue a boil-water alert after three separate samples tested positive for E. coli, a bacterium that can cause severe gastrointestinal illness. (Photo by Natalie Behring/Getty Images)
Jack Kurtz, 10, right, and mother Paula Gillett pose for portrait in their Rockford, Illinois home, November 5, 2009. Jack recovered from a food-borne illness last year. The source of the E. coli that hospitalized him was never determined. (Photo by Lane Christiansen/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images)
Madison Sedbrook, 6, right, and her mother Cindy are in their home at Highlands Ranch on Tuesday. Madison's parents are suing because she got e coli from eating raw cookie dough recalled by Nestle. Hyoung Chang/ The Denver Post (Photo By Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA - FEBRUARY 21: A BJ's Wholesale Club awaits customers on February 21, 2007 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Yesterday, the giant wholesaler announced a voluntary recall of prepackaged Wellsley Farms mushrooms, due to possible trace amounts of E.coli. No cases of the illness have been reported. (Photo by Jeff Fusco/Getty Images)
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