Intensifying storm to bring strong winds, heavy rain and some snow to Midwest, East

Stormy Week Ahead for East Coast

By Weather.com

An intensifying area of low pressure will deliver a trifecta of inclement weather to portions of the Midwest and East through Thursday. Those impacts include strong winds, soaking rainfall that will contribute to commuting hassles, and even a little snow.

The area of low pressure that will strengthen is the one that brought heavy rain, gusty winds and coastal flooding to parts of the Gulf Coast the last few days, and formed partially in response to the mid- and upper-level remnants of Hurricane Patricia this past weekend. As that low moves northward, it will get an injection of energy from a weather system moving into the Midwest, allowing it to strengthen significantly.

RECAP: Texas, Louisiana Soaked from Patricia Remnant

Let's break down the impacts below starting with the winds.

Strong Winds Could Down Tree Limbs, Cause Power Outages

The main threat of strong winds will be Wednesday and Thursday from two different sources.

First, bands of rain and thunderstorms may produce strong wind gusts ahead of a cold front from the Appalachians to much of the Eastern Seaboard from the Carolinas to southern New England. The strong wind gusts over 50 mph may lead to some power outages and downed trees and limbs Wednesday afternoon into Wednesday night.

CITIES: New York | Philadelphia | Raleigh | Washington, D.C.

Locations with the greatest chance for damaging wind gusts are shaded red on our thunderstorm forecast map. However, strong wind gusts are also possible in the areas shaded orange. In areas farther north, these strong gusts may occur simply with bands of rain without lightning.

In addition, the pressure gradient around the large-scale low pressure system pivoting into eastern Canada will produce strong winds over a larger area of the Plains, Midwest and Great Lakes Wednesday. Those strong winds will persist in the Great Lakes through Thursday.

Most locations will see sustained winds of 20 to 30 mph with higher gusts. However, even stronger winds with gusts in excess of 60 mph are possible along the east and southeast shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario. The National Weather Service has posted high wind warnings for those locations. Tree damage, power outages and lakeshore flooding are possible.

Locally Heavy Rain Will Cause Travel Hassles

Steady rainfall, heavy at times, is spreading through the Ohio Valley, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast into early Thursday. Here's an overview of the forecast timing showing when you can expect travel hassles.

Wednesday: Most of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic will be impacted by the rain, which could be heavy at times. This may result in both commuting delays on the roads and at all major airports in the region. Some minor or poor drainage flooding is also possible. The rain may also be accompanied by localized strong wind gusts as mentioned above.

CITIES: Boston | New York | Pittsburgh | Philadelphia | Washington, D.C.

Thursday: The bulk of the rain should be finished, but some showers may linger in New England and Upstate New York. Lake-effect rain or snow bands are possible in the northern and eastern Great Lakes.

A Little Snow From Fleeting Cold Air

The powerful low-pressure system will allow some colder air to sweep through the Midwest Wednesday into Thursday. It's not a noteworthy cold air mass for late October, with high temperatures about 5 to 10 degrees below average in most spots across the region.

However, the combination of strong winds and chilly temperatures will produce wind chill values in the 10s and 20s across parts of the Upper Midwest and northern Plains Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

However, just enough moisture and cold air may combine to bring snow or a rain-snow mix to parts of the Upper Midwest Wednesday and especially Wednesday night into early Thursday. Any slushy accumulations should be minor, and confined to elevated or grassy surfaces in North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Temperatures will quickly turn milder by this weekend across the Midwest, with high temperatures rising above average.

RELATED GALLERY: See pictures of Hurricane Patricia, which hit North America last week:

18 PHOTOS
Hurricane Patricia storm photos, satellite photos and evacuations
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Intensifying storm to bring strong winds, heavy rain and some snow to Midwest, East
IN SPACE - In this handout photo provided by NASA, Hurricane Patricia is seen from the International Space Station. The hurricane made landfall on the Pacfic coast of Mexico on October 23. (Photo by Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)
View of a breakwater following the passage of Hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 24 ,2015. Record-breaking Hurricane Patricia weakened to a tropical storm over north-central Mexico on Saturday, dumping heavy rain that triggered flooding and landslides but so far causing less damage than feared. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
View of a street in Manzanillo, Colima state, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. The strongest hurricane ever recorded crashed into Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, ratcheting up fears that super-storm Patricia will unleash death and destruction with its powerful winds and driving rain. AFP PHOTO / Jonathan Levinson (Photo credit should read Jonathan Levinson/AFP/Getty Images)
View of the street during the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Municipal workers collect branches from a flooded street in Manzanillo, Colima state, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. The strongest hurricane ever recorded crashed into Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, ratcheting up fears that super-storm Patricia will unleash death and destruction with its powerful winds and driving rain. AFP PHOTO / Jonathan Levinson (Photo credit should read Jonathan Levinson/AFP/Getty Images)
View of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23, 2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Puerto Vallarta #Huracán @Patricia https://t.co/sEEBdzwbdG
Hurricane Patricia https://t.co/Om0nKibkMY
VIDEO: Hurricane #Patricia: in Cihuatlán in the state of Colima. Palm trees figting against wind. https://t.co/urNul5eiIJ v @alezrodriguez
Members of the Red Cross prepare a temporary shelter in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mexican soldiers patrol streets during the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Evacuees remain at a shelter in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico on October 23 ,2015, during hurricane Patricia. Monster Hurricane Patricia roared toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Friday, prompting authorities to evacuate villagers, close ports and urge tourists to cancel trips over fears of a catastrophe. The US National Hurricane Center called Patricia the strongest eastern north Pacific hurricane on record. It said the storm will make a potentially catastrophic landfall later Friday in southwestern Mexico. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
View of street at Boca de Pascuales community as residents are evacuated by local authorities before the arrival of hurricane Patricia in Colima State, Mexico on October 22,2015. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, are evacuated on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
A man leaves his house in Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Residents of Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, are evacuated on October 22, 2015, before the arrival of hurricane Patricia. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
Waves break on the beach in Boca de Pascuales, Colima State, Mexico, on October 22, 2015. Fast-moving Patricia grew into an 'extremely dangerous' major hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast on Thursday, forecasters said, warning of possible landslides and flash flooding. AFP PHOTO/HECTOR GUERRERO (Photo credit should read HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images)
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