Solar industry trends

Solar Industry Trends

Use of solar energy is rising like the sun.

During this year's World Solar Challenge 46 cars from 25 countries will compete to be the world's fastest solar-powered vehicle. And while the race has been taking place since 1987, improvements in technology over the years have made vehicles, better, stronger and faster.

But cars aren't the only things being revolutionized by technology and solar energy.

SEE MORE: So what can you power with the sun these days?

Take for example, homes, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association, there are enough residential solar panels in America to power 4.6 million homes.

Adding convenience to going solar for homeowners.

See photos of a solar powered planes trip around the world:
13 PHOTOS
Solar Impulse 2: Trip around the world
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Solar industry trends
Andre Borschberg of Switzerland, a pilot of the Solar Impulse 2 speaks to journalists prior to board his plane at the Nagoya airport in Nagoya on June 24, 2015. Mission controllers cancelled the planned take-off of the Solar Impulse 2 from Nagoya in central Japan early Wednesday because of weather problems in the Pacific Ocean. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - JUNE 29: In this handout image provided by Global Newsroom, Solar Impulse 2, a solar power plane, getting ready to take off from Nagoya Komaki airport tonight at 3:03 am on June 29, 2015. The plane is en route to Hawaii after spending an unscheduled four-week stopover due to bad weather. The 5-day flight to Hawaii will be the eighth and longest of the pioneering plane's 35,000-kilometer journey. (Photo by Jean Revillard/SI2/Global Newsroom via Getty Images)
Andre Borschberg of Switzerland waves while boarding his Solar Impulse 2 prior to his departure for Hawaii at the Nagoya airport in Nagoya on June 24, 2015. The solar plane that has been trapped in Japan for three weeks will take off early June 24, the team confirmed, on the most challenging leg of an attempt to circumnavigate the world without using fuel. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - JUNE 29: In this handout image provided by Global Newsroom, pilot Andre Borschberg during the final preparation of Solar Impulse 2, a solar power plane, from Nagoya Komaki airport tonight at 3:03 am on June 29, 2015. The plane is en route to Hawaii after spending an unscheduled four-week stopover due to bad weather. The 5-day flight to Hawaii will be the eighth and longest of the pioneering plane's 35,000-kilometer journey. (Photo by Jean Revillard/SI2/Global Newsroom via Getty Images)
Pilot Andre Borschberg of Switzerland (C, top), sits aboard Solar Impulse 2, as ground crew pushes the solar plane prior to taking off for Hawaii, at Nagoya's airport early June 24, 2015. The solar plane that has been trapped in Japan for three weeks will take off early June 24, the team confirmed, on the most challenging leg of an attempt to circumnavigate the world without using fuel. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - JUNE 29: In this handout image provided by Global Newsroom, Solar Impulse 2, a solar power plane, getting ready to take off from Nagoya Komaki airport tonight at 3:03 am on June 29, 2015. The plane is en route to Hawaii after spending an unscheduled four-week stopover due to bad weather. The 5-day flight to Hawaii will be the eighth and longest of the pioneering plane's 35,000-kilometer journey. (Photo by Jean Revillard/SI2/Global Newsroom via Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - JUNE 29: In this handout image provided by Global Newsroom, Yasemin and Andre Borschberg prior to the take off of Solar Impulse 2, a solar power plane, from Nagoya Komaki airport tonight at 3:03 am on June 29, 2015. The plane with pilot Borschberg is en route to Hawaii after spending an unscheduled four-week stopover due to bad weather. The 5-day flight to Hawaii will be the eighth and longest of the pioneering plane's 35,000-kilometer journey. (Photo by Jean Revillard/SI2/Global Newsroom via Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - JUNE 29: In this handout image provided by Global Newsroom, Solar Impulse 2, a solar power plane, getting ready to take off from Nagoya Komaki airport tonight at 3:03 am on June 29, 2015. The plane is en route to Hawaii after spending an unscheduled four-week stopover due to bad weather. The 5-day flight to Hawaii will be the eighth and longest of the pioneering plane's 35,000-kilometer journey. (Photo by Jean Revillard/SI2/Global Newsroom via Getty Images)
Pilot Andre Borschberg of Switzerland (R, top), sits aboard Solar Impulse 2, as ground crew pushes the solar plane prior to taking off for Hawaii, at Nagoya's airport early June 24, 2015. The solar plane that has been trapped in Japan for three weeks will take off early June 24, the team confirmed, on the most challenging leg of an attempt to circumnavigate the world without using fuel. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
Andre Borschberg of Switzerland (4th R) poses next to the Japanese and the Swiss national flags while boarding his Solar Impulse 2 prior to his departure for Hawaii at the Nagoya airport in Nagoya on June 24, 2015. The solar plane that has been trapped in Japan for three weeks will take off early June 24, the team confirmed, on the most challenging leg of an attempt to circumnavigate the world without using fuel. AFP PHOTO / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
The Solar Impulse 2 aircraft takes off from the Nagoya airport in Aichi prefecture, central Japan on June 29, 2015 for a flight over the Pacific Ocean. Solar Impulse 2 has 17,000 solar cells and on-board rechargeable batteries. Its top speed is 140 kilometres an hour. The journey to Hawaii is 7,900 kilometers and is expected to last at least five days and five nights. AFP PHOTO / JIJI PRESS JAPAN OUT (Photo credit should read JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)
Swiss pilots Andre Borschberg (L) and Bertrand Piccard (R) of Solar Impulse 2, the world's only solar-powered aircraft, react upon their arrival at Mandalay international airport on March 19, 2015. Solar Impulse 2 took off from the Indian holy city of Varanasi for Myanmar, its fourth flight after embarking on a landmark journey to circumnavigate the globe powered solely by the sun. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images)
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And the options are growing as well check out these solar windows. A tech company claims their new cell can produce 50 times the energy of traditional panels.

Solar has also gone sporty. In recent years several stadiums across the world have invested in sustainability.

The Indianapolis speedway, home to the indy 500, has the largest solar farm in the world, enough to power a thousand homes.

SEE MORE: Out-of-this-world photos from Australia's World Solar Challenge

Just this year Cochin International Airport in India became the very first in the world to be completely solar powered.

That's 45 acres cranking out a ton of power and cutting back on pollution.

So as always, as costs come down, usage goes up. And in this case, that's good for everyone.

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