Fourteen dead as South Carolina gripped by historic flooding

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Death Toll from South Carolina Floods Rises to 14

South Carolina grappled with the damage wrought by record rainfall, as the death toll from widespread flooding rose to 14 on Tuesday and residents braced for more evacuations in areas near swollen waterways and dams across the state.

Predictions of sunny skies in coming days provided only small comfort. More than 800 people were living in shelters after floodwater forced them from their homes, and officials said new evacuations were likely as several rivers remained above flood stage and dams were being monitored for breaches.

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"We are still in the mode that the next 36 to 48 hours will be volatile," Governor Nikki Haley told a news conference. "Don't let the sunshine fool you."

Officials said about 300 state-maintained roads and 160 bridges remained closed. Haley stressed the need for motorists to mind police barricades on flooded roads after reports of people moving the barricades or driving around them.

South Carolina flood rescues:

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South Carolina flood rescues
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Fourteen dead as South Carolina gripped by historic flooding
DNR officer Brett Irvin and Lexington Co. Deputy Dan Rusinyak carry June Loch to dry land after she was rescued from her home in the Pine Glen subdivision off of Tram road on Oct. 5, 2015 in the St. Andrews area of Columbia. Residents are having to abandon their homes because of flooding coinciding with release of water from the dam. (Tim Dominick/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4: Charlene Stennis is escorted to safety after her son was rescued from a stranded vehicle in a flooded roadway October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4: Residents and first responders launch boats to rescue people trapped in their homes October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4: Police watch rescue boats looking for trapped in their homes October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
A basketball backboard is seen collapsed on a flooded yard in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters help a local resident to cross a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4: An abandoned vehicle sits in flood water the morning October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Firefighters evaluate damage on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A small sculpture left by local residents is seen on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A man checks his stranded car on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A fire truck on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 4: Residents and first responders launch boats to rescue people trapped in their homes October 4, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. South Carolina experiencied a record rainfall, with at leasrt 11.5 inches falling October 3. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
A firefighter checks the road in front of his truck on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters evaluate damage on a flooded street in downtown Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Police block the entrance of highway 17 due to the floods in Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Police block the entrance of highway 17 due to the floods in Charleston, South Carolina on October 4, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water and forecasters warned that more heavy downpours could trigger historic flooding in the crucial next 24 hours. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast and forecasters say the worst is not over quite yet. News reports blamed the wild weather on four deaths in the United States since Thursday, all in the Carolinas. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A firefighter's truck blocks the Garner Ferry road where flash floods destroyed number of businesses in Columbia, South Carolina on October 5, 2015. Relentless rain left large areas of the US southeast under water. The states of North and South Carolina have been particularly hard hit, but the driving rain in recent days has spared almost none of the US East Coast. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Zahid and Davon Richardson are greeted by a rescue team in the Shandon Crossing apartment complex on Oct. 5, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. Rescue crews from across the country worked to help those in need after rain and flood water ravaged the area. (Matt Walsh/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - OCTOBER 5: Emergency teams search for stranded people in the Forest Acres neighborhood October 5, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend which stranded motorists and residents and forced hundreds of evacuations and rescues. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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The governor said she could not yet estimate the cost of the devastation but noted "the damage is going to be heartbreaking for a lot of people."

More than 2 feet (60 cm) of rain have fallen since Friday in parts of South Carolina, which avoided a hit from Hurricane Joaquin but experienced historic rainfall and flooding due to a combination of weather conditions mostly unrelated to that storm.

Of the 14 people who died, eight drowned and six were killed in weather-related car crashes, the state Department of Public Safety said. The extended rainstorm also was blamed for two deaths in North Carolina.

In the South Carolina capital of Columbia, which experienced its wettest days on record over the weekend, the University of South Carolina announced it was cancelling classes through Friday due to the flooding.

More photos of the South Carolina floods and East Coast rain:

5 PHOTOS
South Carolina floods, east coast rain
See Gallery
Fourteen dead as South Carolina gripped by historic flooding
DNR officer Brett Irvin and Lexington Co. Deputy Dan Rusinyak carry June Loch to dry land after she was rescued from her home in the Pine Glen subdivision off of Tram road on Oct. 5, 2015 in the St. Andrews area of Columbia, S.C. Residents are having to abandon their homes because of flooding coinciding with release of water from the dam. (Tim Dominick/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
EASTOVER, SC - OCTOBER 6: Trey McMillian looks over the damage done by flood waters on a road in Eastover on October 6, 2015 in Eastover, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts over the weekend and continues to face resulting flooding. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Pictured is the inside of the Pavlovich Balley School Building, home of the Columbia Classical Ballet, as electrical crews shut off power, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. (Gerry Melendez/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
Rescue crews from across the country work to help those in need after rain and flood water ravaged the Columbia, S.C. area on Oct. 4, 2015. (Matt Walsh/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
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Though floodwater was receding in some places, officials warned people to remain vigilant. Early Tuesday, emergency responders in Orangeburg County pulled three people to safety in a boat after they were surrounded by rushing water from the North Edisto River, the State newspaper reported.

The highest recorded amount of rain in South Carolina was 26.8 inches (68 cm), which fell over several days in an area just east of Charleston, National Weather Service meteorologist Carl Barnes said.

On Tuesday, Barnes said brighter days were ahead.

"The worst has passed us, in terms of rainfall," he said. "We'll definitely have sun and some very welcome drying out for the rest of the week."


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