Astronaut successfully controlled robot on Earth from space station

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Astronaut Successfully Controlled Robot On Earth From Space Station


An astronaut recently controlled a robot on Earth from aboard the International Space Station with astounding precision.

Andreas Mogensen remotely took hold over the blue-and-white robot and directed it toward a circuit board.

Once at the board, the rover, via Mogensen's joystick-based control, successfully placed a round peg into a quite narrow hole.

The process used tactile-based technology; Mogensen could essentially "feel" his way through the entire experiment.

A series of signals relayed by a dedicated array of satellites working simultaneously provided Mogensen with force-feedback in real-time.

On the rover's first peg-insertion attempt, the astronaut was able to feel something wasn't quite right.

Specifically, he could tell the pin hit the sides of the hole.

The second attempt was successful—and brought cheers.

Researchers anticipate such technology could be useful for upcoming Mars missions.

The technology has potential applications on Earth as well. Essentially any dangerous job where a human wouldn't want to go could be made much easier.

But the potential is still greater.

There are presently places on Earth—like the inside of a thermonuclear reactor brandishing one-million-degree heat—where a human simply cannot be. Haptic technology might offer a solution.

See photos from the latest expedition to the ISS:
7 PHOTOS
NTP: Expedition 44 NASA, Russia going to ISS
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Astronaut successfully controlled robot on Earth from space station
The Soyuz TMA-17M spacecraft with the international crew of US astronaut Kjell Lindgren, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui blasts off a launch pad of a Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on July 23, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER NEMENOV (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - JULY 23: The Soyuz TMA-17M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on July 23, 2015 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The Soyuz rocket carries Expedition 44 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren of NASA, and Flight Engineer Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) into orbit to begin their five month mission on the International Space Station. (Photo by Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - JULY 23: The Soyuz TMA-17M rocket, as seen in this long exposure, launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on July 23, 2015 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The Soyuz rocket carries Expedition 44 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren of NASA, and Flight Engineer Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) into orbit to begin their five month mission on the International Space Station. (Photo by Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via Getty Images)
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - JULY 23: Expedition 44 Flight Engineer Kimiya Yui, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), top; Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren of NASA, center, and Soyuz Commander Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), bottom, wave farewell prior to boarding the Soyuz TMA-17M spacecraft for launch on July 23, 2015 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Kononenko, Lindgren, and Yui will spend the next five months aboard the International Space Station. (Photo by Aubrey Gemignani/NASA via Getty Images)
The Soyuz TMA-17M spacecraft with the international crew of US astronaut Kjell Lindgren, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui blasts off a launch pad of a Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on July 23, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER NEMENOV (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images)
(From L) The Soyuz TMA-17M spacecraft International Space Station (ISS) crew of US astronaut Kjell Lindgren, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui leave their hotel for a launch pad of the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Baikonur on July 22, 2015 a few hours before blast-off. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER NEMENOV (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images)
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