Hurricane Katrina's impact beyond New Orleans

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Why Hurricane Katrina Was 'Not An Equal Opportunity Storm' Or Recovery

There's a reason Hurricane Katrina conjures up thoughts of New Orleans for so many. The city was decimated by the storm and TV news crews captured the devastation for all to see. Today, some neighborhoods have yet to see a full recovery.

SEE MORE:Special coverage on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

But the impact was felt far beyond the Big Easy. More than a million residents in Mississippi were impacted by Katrina, and for some, the effects of the storm still linger.

See photos of the damage outside New Orleans:
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Katrina 10 year: Damage outside Louisiana
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Hurricane Katrina's impact beyond New Orleans
DEERFIELD BEACH, FL - AUGUST 25: A man who refused to give his name covers his face as 50-mph winds blow in advance of Hurricane Katrina August 25, 2005 in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Katrina is expected to make landfall later in the day as a weak Category 1 hurricane. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Getty Images)
Hurricane Katrina approaches Miami's South Beach area on Thursday, August 25, 2005. (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage)
Miami, UNITED STATES: (L-R) Katina and Lashawn Ross, Angie Martinez and Betsy Rossi walk through a street flooded by rains from hurricane Katrina 26 August 2005, in Naranja, in southern Miami, Florida. Storm-weary Florida braced for yet another hit as Hurricane Katrina strengthened over the Gulf of Mexico 26 August 2005 after pummeling the Miami area, leaving at least seven people dead and 1.4 million without power. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
BILOXI, MS - AUGUST 30: A car is seen in a beachfront pool just across Highway 90 August 30, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. Approximately 100 people are feared dead and estimates put the property loss at nearly $30 billion as Hurricane Katrina could become the costliest storm in US history. (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images)
Gulfport, UNITED STATES: A man contemplates a pile of debris in Gulfport, Mississippi, 31 August, 2005, two days after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast. Flood victims battered by Hurricane Katrina faced a silent but equally deadly enemy Wednesday in toxin- and bacteria-laden waters carrying the threat of contamination and disease. Health officials said the floodwaters whipped up by the devastating storm carried a potentially lethal cocktail of toxic chemicals, gasoline and human waste. Consumption, or in some cases simple contact with such highly contaminated water can result in diseases and ailments ranging from severe gastrointestinal illness to skin rashes and allergies. 'The threat is very serious and will only increase as the days go by without the waters receding,' said Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. AFP PHOTO/Nicholas KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Beth Stump comforts her 9-week-old daugher Breanna as they wait for supplies from the Salvation Army on August 31, 2005, in Biloxi, Mississippi. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall and battered the Gulf coast killing 1,833 people in five states. (Patrick Schneider/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Mobile, UNITED STATES: A volunteers unloads Meals-Ready To-Eat (MRE) to cars full of residents who waited hours in line for aide 31 August 2005 at the Mobile Greyhound Park where relief supplies were being distributed following Hurricane Katrina. While hundreds are feared dead in Mississippi and Louisiana, no deaths have been reported in Alabama. Mobile, a port city of 200,000 people located in a Gulf of Mexico bay, was flooded and many neighborhoods remained without power. AFP Photo/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J.RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Mobile, UNITED STATES: Volunteers pass out Meals-Ready To-Eat (MRE) to cars full of residnts who waited hours in line for aide 31 August 2005 at the Mobile Greyhound Park where relief supplies were being distributed following Hurricane Katrina. While hundreds are feared dead in Mississippi and Louisiana, no deaths have been reported in Alabama. Mobile, a port city of 200,000 people located in a Gulf of Mexico bay, was flooded and many neighborhoods remained without power. AFP Photo/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J.RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
HATTIESBURG, MS - AUGUST 31: JoAnn Hill hugs her son Jerome Moore Hill August 31, 2005 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The two were reunited after JoAnn had gone to her mother's home to ride out Hurricane Katrina. She returned to find her home damaged, but her son unharmed. (Photo by Marianne Todd/Getty Images)
HATTIESBURG, MS - AUGUST 31: This home suffered sever damage from trees toppled when Hurricane Katrina roared through August 31, 2005 in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. The mayor of New Orleans say officials there fear the death toll could be in the thousands. (Photo by Marianne Todd/Getty Images)
GULFPORT, MS - SEPTEMBER 1: Firefighter Joe Sorrentino takes a break from the recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina September 1, 2005 in Gulfport, Mississippi. Sorrentino is from the Miami, Florida area and he came along with other firefighters from across the country to assist in the recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Caldero plans to work for a couple of weeks before transitioning out. (Photo by Ross Taylor/Getty Images)
MERIDIAN, MS - SEPTEMBER 1: Highway 90 lies fractured September 1, 2005 in Meridian, Mississippi. Residents are still without electricity, water or communications for a third day after Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, leaving a trail of destruction. (Photo by Barry WilliamsGetty Images)
BILOXI, MS - SEPTEMBER 1: (GERMANY OUT) Hardy Jackson Jr. (12) stands in the area where his home previously stood on September 1, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. Though Hardy, his siblings and his father survived the blow of the hurricane, his mother met a different fate. She was ripped from her husband's grip as they held onto a tree when the water rushed in. Mississippi confirmed death toll was over 120 by Thursday as more rescue teams combed the devasted areas. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)
Residents inspect damage left by Hurricane Katrina 30 August 2005, in Biloxi, Mississippi. At least 80 people were feared dead along the coast of the southern state of Mississippi, where glitzy casinos, plush homes and shrimp fishing businesses lay in ruins, after a storm surge up to 30 feet (10 metres) high crashed ashore on Monday. Helpless authorities in New Orleans meanwhile watched as surging floodwaters gushed through a 200 feet (600 meter) hole in the 17th Street Canal defences, indundating a low-lying city already 80 percent under water. AFP PHOTO/Robert SULLIVAN (Photo credit should read ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 31: People walk down Canal street August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas from Hurricane Katrina. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Scott Morgan/Getty Images)
Beth Stump comforts her 9-week-old daugher Breanna as they wait for supplies from the Salvation Army on August 31, 2005, in Biloxi, Mississippi. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall and battered the Gulf coast killing 1,833 people in five states. (Patrick Schneider/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
BILOXI, MS - SEPTEMBER 1: Biloxi resident Sherry Finkelstein (L) bathes in an open fire hydrant September 1, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. Residents are still without electricity, water or communications for a third day after Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, leaving a trail of destruction. Hundreds are feared dead in Biloxi after being trapped in their homes during the storms. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
GULFPORT, MS - SEPTEMBER 1: (GERMANY OUT) Scene from inside a destroyed building along interstate 90 on September 1, 2005 in Gulfport, Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina tore through the town. Mississippi confirmed death toll was over 120 by Thursday as more rescue teams combed the devasted areas. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)
An Urban Search and Rescue worker searches a home for survivors of Hurricane Katrina in Waveland, Miss. Message scrawled on the door reads 'I'm OK - With Family.' Whole sections of the tiny town were covered by the storm surge, preventing rescue workers from reaching it for several days. (Photo by Craig Warga/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
WAVELAND, MS - SEPTEMBER 3 : (GERMANY OUT) The writing on the wall of 441 Waveland Ave. indicates that the search and rescue team did not find any dead bodies inside the house on September 3, 2005 in Waveland, Mississippi. Hurricane Katrina's category 5 strength left the coast of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisina in ruins. Mississippi confirmed death toll was over 120 by Thursday as more rescue teams combed the devasted areas. (Photo by Marvi Lacar/Getty Images)
BILOXI, MS - SEPTEMBER 04: Parishioner Jennifer Munday takes part in services at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer (shown in background) which was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina September 4, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. The congregation gathered on the ruins of the church for the first service since the hurricane struck. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
BILOXI, MS - SEPTEMBER 6: A staircase hangs in a tree after Hurricane Katrina plowed through the area destroying many homes September 6, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. Residents continue to salvage belongings in the devastated area along the coast line. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
WAVELAND, MS - SEPTEMBER 8: The Bay St. Louis Bridge, connecting Waveland and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, was destroyed in the hardest hit area during Hurricane Katrina on September 8, 2005 in Waveland, Mississippi. The communities, once lined with middle to upper class homes, faced the east wall of Katrina and is now little more than a pile of debris. (Photo by Marianne Todd/Getty Images)
GULFPORT, MS - SEPTEMBER 11: The floating pink 'Copa Casino' sits on land after being washed ashore by Hurricane Katrina September 11, 2005 in Gulfport, Mississippi. Katrina devastated large parts of New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast August 29, 2005. The Category Four Hurricane breached levees that protected New Orleans, which is roughly 70 percent below sea below, causing catastrophic flooding. (Photo by Jerry Grayson/Helifilms Australia PTY Ltd/Getty Images)
BILOXI, MS - SEPTEMBER 12: A sign of hope stands outside Beauvoir, Biloxi's historic home of President Jefferson Davis on the U.S. Highway September 12, 2005 in Biloxi, Mississippi. While the main home was left standing, it's interior was gutted, and the portion of the grounds containing the former President's personal effects was destroyed by Katrina's surge. (Photo by Marianne Todd/Getty Images)
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The storm brought heavy damage to Alabama as well, especially on the shores. Some areas are still rebounding ten years later, and there are residents who worry that they may be due for another storm soon.

But Katrina changed lives far beyond the regions hit directly by the storm. Explore the interactive experience below to see stories about how people around the world are still impacted today.



See more coverage of the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina:
Post-Katrina house rises to new heights in uptown New Orleans
The Hurricane Katrina memorial you didn't know about
Hurricane prediction technology more amazing than ever
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