Hurricane prediction technology more amazing than ever

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Hurricane Prediction Technology More Amazing Than Ever

Hurricanes are one of the most devastating forces in nature. A look back at Katrina shows us high winds, torrential rain, coastal flooding.

That's why it's so important to be able to accurately predict and track these monster storms. Now, we have some incredible new tools to do that.

See the evolution of hurricane technology:
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Katrina 10 year: Hurricane technology evolution
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Hurricane prediction technology more amazing than ever
CANADA - SEPTEMBER 20: Hurricane watch: Meteorologist Mark Zimmer of the National Hurricane Centre in Coral Gables; Fla.; keeps track of Hugo's path on a computer monitor. (Photo by Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Katrina is first noticed:

Computer screens at the National Weather Service office in Shreveport, Louisiana, track the progress of hurricane Katrina as it approaches the Louisiana coastline on Sunday morning August 28. Katrina, currently a category 5 hurricane, is predicted to make landfall Monday morning August 29. (Photo by Mario Villafuerte/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

WEST PALM BEACH, FL - MAY 18: Bob Kreiner looks out of the window of his Dome home, touted as hurricane proof by Dome Technology in Idaho, May 18, 2006 in West Palm Beach, Florida. With hurricane season beginning on June 1, many people have shown interest in the homes because the dome provides the most efficient structural system to withstand hurricane force winds. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Miami, UNITED STATES: US President George W. Bush(L) is briefed on hurricane forecast technology by National Hurricane Center Tropical Prediction Center Director Max Mayfield while visiting the center in Miami, Florida, 31 July 2006. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
GULFPORT, MS - AUGUST 29: In this handout image provided by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff speaks to the media at the Gulf Port International Airport as preparations for Hurricane Gustav continue August 29, 2008 in Gulfport, Mississippi. Tropical Storm Gustav is the seventh named storm of the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season. The New Orleans area is bracing for the storm that forecasters are saying will make landfall west of New Orleans. (Photo by Mike Lutz/DHS via Getty Images)
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - SEPTEMBER 02: NASA flight Engineer, Bill Fleming, speaks with reporters as he sits in the cockpit of the DC-8 aircraft before flying it into Hurricane Earl on another mission during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment from the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport on September 2, 2010 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The program that is taking place from August 15 to September 30 is using three NASA aircraft flying over the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea to gather data from the instruments on board, as scientist try to answer questions about how and why hurricanes form and strengthen. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI - AUGUST 30: Hurricane Specialist, Robbie Berg, studies computer models as he tracks Hurricane Earl at the National Hurricane Center on August 30, 2010 in Miami, Florida. The storm which should be parallel to the U.S. coast line later this week may affect any area from North Carolina to Maine. Currently Hurricane Earl is at Category 3 with winds at 120 MPH moving west northwest at 15 MPH in the Caribbean ocean. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - SEPTEMBER 02: Carolyn Butler, a computer scientist, talks to reporters about the information displayed on computers, that was gathered yesterday, from Hurricane Earl as she sits inside the DC-8 aircraft that flew the mission during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment from the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport on September 2, 2010 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The program that is taking place from August 15 to September 30 is using three NASA aircraft flying over the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea to gather data from the instruments on board, as scientist try to answer questions about how and why hurricanes form and strengthen. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 22: Todd Kimberlain a hurricane forcaster studies computer models as he tracks Hurricane Irene at the National Hurricane Center on August 22, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Irene is the first Hurricane of the 2011 Atlantic season with winds at 80mph currently and may hit the East coast later this week with higher winds projected. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 24: Computer screens are seen as specialists track Hurricane Irene at the National Hurricane Center on August 24, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Irene is on track to move over the Bahamas as a category 3 storm and from there cooler ocean temperatures are expected to lessen the wind speeds, but it could still be a major storm as it approaches the North Carolina coast August 27. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 21: Summer Knowles, a television reporter, has her hair blown in the wind created by the twelve fans behind her as she does a report on what is called the Wall of Wind at the Florida International University engeneering center, the nation's only university research facility that is capable of simulating a Category 5 hurricane with wind-driven rain on August 21, 2012 in Miami, Florida. With 8,400 horsepower behind them, the fans, each six feet in diameter, can generate wind speeds up to 157 miles per hour and are used to test the hurricane resiliency of everything from private homes to warehouses to light poles. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 21: A videographer stands in front of twelve fans, that create what is called a Wall of Wind, sit at the Florida International University engeneering center, the nation’s only university research facility that is capable of simulating a Category 5 hurricane with wind-driven rain on August 21, 2012 in Miami, Florida. With 8,400 horsepower behind them, the fans, each six feet in diameter, can generate wind speeds up to 157 miles per hour and are used to test the hurricane resiliency of everything from private homes to warehouses to light poles. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MAY 28: An emergency official uses his cell phone to track the path of a hypothetical hurricane as he takes part in the annual Hurricane Emergency Operations Center functional exercise on May 28, 2014 in Miami, Florida. With the Atlantic hurricane season starting June 1 and running through November, the city's hurricane exercise consisted of more than 60 participants including Emergency Management, first responders and various organizations involved in emergency response and support roles, evaluators and observers dealing with the scenario of a hurricane hitting the Miami area. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 03: James Franklin, Branch Chief of the Hurricane Specialist Unit at the National Hurricane Center, observes a computer screen as he tracks Hurricane Arthur, the first of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season on July 3, 2014 in Miami, Florida. The National Hurricane Center forecasters predict this hurricane could be a Category 2 when it reaches the North Carolina coast area throughout the day from July 3, 2014 to July 4, 2014. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JULY 03: Daniel Brown, Senior Hurricane Specialist at the National Hurricane Center, tracks Hurricane Arthur, the first of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season on July 3, 2014 in Miami, Florida. The National Hurricane Center forecasters predict this hurricane could be a Category 2 when it reaches the North Carolina coast area throughout the day from July 3, 2014 to July 4, 2014. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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This is one of them a drone called "coyote." It can go where no manned planes can, up to 1,500 feet above the ocean.

NOAA's hurricane hunter plane drops coyote into the storm. It can then be operated remotely -- taking measurements for about 90 minutes before its battery runs out and it falls into the ocean. Last year's hurricane season was its first in operation.

SEE MORE: Special coverage on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

"We had 2 successful missions last year in hurricane Edouard which is a storm not many people paid attention to. It was really far out in the ocean, but it turned out to be a very important storm for us to study."
The data was transmitted live to the plane then relayed to the national hurricane center. Forecasters say the information allows them to more accurately predict a hurricane's intensity.

The other new weapon improved storm surge sensors.

"The most dangerous aspect of a hurricane sometimes isn't the wind, it's the water. Back in 2005 hurricane Katrina brought an astonishing 27 foot storm surge to this part of the Mississippi gulf coast - the highest ever on a U.S. Coastline. Now our ability to accurately forecast these types of surge events is critical to warning the public."

This one is more than 25 feet off the water anchored by steel rods driven 70 feet down. The sensors not only measure the surge. Wind, air temperature and water levels are measured every six minutes.

Allowing forecasters to tell people how high the surge will get and if they need to evacuate. Saving lives and money.

More Katrina coverage on AOL.com:Facts about the impact of Hurricane Katrina:
After the storm, a hunger for traditionKatrina made landfall as 400 miles wide with 100-140mph winds
Are you ready for a Hurricane?Katrina was the largest U.S hurricane ever recorded to make landfall
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