This company wants to make license plates for drones

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Drones, Drones, and Drones


Drones are constantly at the center of the stage, raising controversy between their widespread amateur use and all the issues that come with a large scale implementation of plans to use unmanned quadcopters for commercial purposes. While many are enthusiastic about what they see as a technology that can revolutionize the way we move things and people, or at least enjoy seeing the futuristic-looking devices hovering over our heads, others have raised opposing views on their use.

In an attempt to ease the transition into an environment where drones are considered a safe system, a team of engineers is developing "LightCense," a project that will allow us to identify these flying devices and their pilots, just like we use license plates for cars.



LightCense uses a combination of colors that blink in sequence and mark the "identity" of the specific drone. This is a very simple feature that allows people to simply look at the colors and memorize the sequence in case they need to report any unlawful or suspicious activity. On top of this an app can use your phone camera to "recognize" the pattern and tell you the drone's ID and the pilot's name.

What do you think about drones regulation?



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Potentially harmful technologies: drones, self driving cars, hoverboards
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This company wants to make license plates for drones
KNUTSFORD, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 13: A youth poses as he rides a hoverboard, which are also known as self-balancing scooters and balance boards, on October 13, 2015 in Knutsford, England. The British Crown Prosecution Service have declared that the devices are illegal as they are are too unsafe to ride on the road, and too dangerous to ride on the pavement. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
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