Greece and lenders agree bailout, shares rally

Greek Bailout Deal Nearly Complete for More Than $90B in Financing

Greece and its international lenders reached an 85 billion euro bailout agreement on Tuesday after nailing down the terms of new loans needed to save the country from financial ruin.

The deal, which came after 23 hours of talks that continued through the night, must still be adopted by Greece's parliament and by euro zone countries.

The currency bloc's finance ministers are expected to give their approval on Friday in time for Greece to make a crucial 3.2 billion euro debt repayment that falls due next week.

Related images of Greek bailout talks:

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Greece and lenders agree bailout, shares rally
ATHENS, GREECE - JULY 03: Pensioners without ATM cards wait in queue outside a bank branch to withdraw money from their pension funds on July 03, 2015 in Athens, Greece. (Photo by Salih Baran/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Pensioners wait outside a closed branch of the Greek National bank in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 29: People wait in line to withdraw 60 euros from an ATM after Greece closed its banks on June 29, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece closed its banks and imposed capital controls on Sunday to monitor the growing strains on its crippled financial system, bringing the prospect of being forced out of the euro into plain sight. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A man withdraws the withdrawal limit of 60 euros at an ATM machine in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Pensioners queue outside a closed branch of the Greek National bank in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Foreign anti-EU activists protest in front of the Greek parliament in Athens, during a demonstration calling for 'NO' at referendum and for Greece's exit from the eurozone on June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras stunned Europe late Friday with a surprise call for a July 5 referendum on the latest cash-for-reforms package and advised voters against backing a deal that he said spelled further 'humiliation'..AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 28: People wait in a queue in front of a bank's ATM to withdraw their cash in Athens, Greece on June 28, 2015. Greeks are anxious about whether the European Central Bank will increase the emergency liquidity assistance, banks can draw on from the country's central bank or not. (Photo by Ayhan Mehmet/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building on June 21, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Greek Presidential Guard conducts his ceremonial march as protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building on June 21, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building in Athens, Greece, June 21, 2015. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 3: A Greek flag billows in the wind on the Acropolis Hill on June 3, 2015, in Athens, Greece. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is expected to be presented with the international creditors' plan of tough economic reforms for Greece in order to unlock 7.2 billion Euros of rescue loans later today. It is unclear whether Greece will accept the offer, as Tsipras has previously called for his own proposals to be considered by the creditors (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: View of the index in the Hellenic Exchange office on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15:.Woman pass by Hellenic Exchange office in Athens on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images))
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: View of the index in the Hellenic Exchange office on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A woman walks past Bank of Greece headquarters in central Athens on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Locals visit the Green market on June 15 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Pensioners play backgammon in front of closed shop on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Women buy on cheep clothing at a flea market on June 15 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A man walks past graffiti featuring the word 'Time' but using the Euro sign in place of the letter 'e'on a wall in Athens on June 15, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras insisted in an oped piece in a Greek newspaper on June 15, 2015 that Athens would 'wait patiently' until the International Monetary Fund and the European Union became 'more realistic', a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed, bringing the threat of a Greek exit from the euro closer than ever. AFP PHOTO/ LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
An elderly men stands outside the Athens central market on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ Louisa Gouliamaki (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Local people pass by graffiti that says 'Greece vs Everybody' on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
People read newspaper's headlines in central Athens on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ Louisa Gouliamaki (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Greek shares rallied, with the banking index climbing 3 percent, while the government's two-year borrowing costs fell to a five-month low.

The agreement gives Greece some respite after a turbulent year marked by acrimonious talks with lenders, the imposition of capital controls and a three-week shutdown of its banks before Athens capitulated last month to creditors' demands for deep austerity measures in order to receive new loans.

But the deal has caused a rebellion within Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras's Syriza party, forcing him to rely on opposition support in parliament and raising talk of early elections in the autumn.

Tsipras wants parliament to approve the deal by Thursday, before the euro zone finance ministers reconvene. This would pave the way for aid disbursements by Aug. 20, when a 3.2 billion euro debt payment is due to the European Central Bank.

But he could face an obstacle from Parliament Speaker Zoe Constantopoulou, one of the creditors' fiercest critics, who may delay a parliamentary committee expected on Wednesday till Thursday, potentially pushing back the vote, Mega TV reported.

Doubts remain about whether a leftist government elected on a pledge to reverse austerity can implement the punishing terms of a deal critics say compromises the left's basic principles.

"It is a very tough deal. The left had to either escape or take huge responsibilities and prove it can help society," Health Minister Panagiotis Kouroublis told local radio, calling for snap elections to lock in popular support.

"After this deal the prime minister should call for elections, so that the Greek people can vote on whether they approve the program or want something else," he said.

The European Commission confirmed a deal had been struck at a technical level and that political assessment would follow.

Euro zone finance ministry officials taking part in the so-called 'euro working group' agreed to recommend approval of the bailout when euro zone finance ministers meet on Friday, a source at the Italian Treasury said.

Still, officials in skeptical northern European countries remained cautious, pending final approval of the deal.

"ONE STEP AT A TIME"

"There remains work to be done with details," said Finnish Finance Minister Alexander Stubb. "We must take one step at a time. Agreement is a big word."

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker was due to hold talks later on Tuesday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande.

Misgivings about giving yet more money to Athens run deep in Germany, the euro zonecountry that has contributed most to Greece's two bailouts since 2010.

German Deputy Finance Minister Jens Spahn told Reuters the deal should be able to stand for the next few years rather just a few months.

Approval of the agreement would close a painful chapter for Greece, which resisted the austerity terms demanded by creditors for much of the year before relenting under threat of being bounced out of the euro zone.

After a deal in principle last month, talks began in Athens three weeks ago to craft an agreement covering details of reform measures, the timeline for their implementation and the amount of aid needed.

A Greek Finance Ministry official said the pact would be worth up to 85 billion euros ($94 billion) in fresh loans over three years. Greek banks would get 10 billion euros immediately and would be recapitalized by the end of the year.

An EU diplomat said the agreement was worth between 82 billion and 85 billion euros.

The latest round of talks with inspectors from four creditor institutions -- the European Commission, European Central Bank, the European bailout fund and the International Monetary Fund -- progressed smoothly, in contrast to the bad-tempered encounters of earlier in the year.

In talks that dragged through Monday night, the sides agreed on the three main sticking points - dealing with non-performing loans held by banks, setting up an asset sales fund, and deregulation of the natural gas market.

The talks also agreed on final fiscal targets that should govern the bailout effort, aiming for a primary budget surplus -- which excludes interest payments -- from 2016, a government official said.

($1 = 0.9074 euros)

(Additional reporting by Karolina Tagaris and Lefteris Papadimas in Athens, Giselda Vagnoni in Rome; Writing by Michele Kambas and Deepa Babington; Editing by Giles Elgood and Gareth Jones)

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