Shocking hidden camera shows blatant anti-gay workplace discrimination

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When Swedish Youtubers Konrad Ydhage and Olle Öberg followed up on a tip from a viewer about discrimination in the workplace, they had no idea how much they would truly uncover.

STHLM Panda is a group that conducts hidden camera social experiments and posts them to Youtube, based in Sweden. Their latest video is causing quite the outrage, when Ydhage and Öberg interviewed for the same job at a warehouse company.

The video description explains the duo's motives: "Gay vs Hetero - Job Interview is a social experiment we conducted with a tips by one of our followers. He wrote to us that he got fired when his boss found out he was gay. He asked us to look into it. We brought hidden cameras and exposed."

While the video is not spoken in English, STHLM Panda has provided handy subtitles that make it easy to follow along. We can't believe this is real...see for yourself:



So we'd like to know, have you ever experienced discrimination in the workplace?


See photos from another case of workplace discrimination:
6 PHOTOS
SCOTUS Muslim woman Abercrombie discrimination
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Shocking hidden camera shows blatant anti-gay workplace discrimination
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Samantha Elauf (C), her mother Majda Elauf (L) of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission General Counsel David Lopes leave the U.S. Supreme Court after the court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch February 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Elauf filed a charge of religious discrimination with the EEOC saying Abercrombie & Fitch violated discrimination laws in 2008 by declining to hire her because she wore a head scarf, a symbol of her Muslim faith. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Samantha Elauf of Tulsa, Oklahoma, appears outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch February 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Elauf filed a charge of religious discrimination with the EEOC saying Abercrombie & Fitch violated discrimination laws in 2008 by declining to hire her because she wore a head scarf, a symbol of her Muslim faith. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Majda Elauf (C with grey scarf) of Tulsa, Oklahoma, is surrounded by journalists as they interview her daughter, Samantha Elauf, outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch February 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Elauf filed a charge of religious discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission saying Abercrombie & Fitch violated discrimination laws in 2008 by declining to hire her because she wore a head scarf, a symbol of her Muslim faith. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Lauren Schreiber (L) and Umna Khan join other supporters from The Council on American-Islamic Relations during a news conference outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch February 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Samantha Elauf of Tulsa, Oklahoma, filed a charge of religious discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission saying Abercrombie & Fitch violated discrimination laws in 2008 by declining to hire her because she wore a head scarf, a symbol of her Muslim faith. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Samantha Elauf (C), her mother Majda Elauf (2nd R) of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission General Counsel David Lopez (R) leave the U.S. Supreme Court after the court heard oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch February 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. Elauf filed a charge of religious discrimination with the EEOC saying Abercrombie & Fitch violated discrimination laws in 2008 by declining to hire her because she wore a head scarf, a symbol of her Muslim faith. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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