This website shows you what the aftermath would be if an atomic bomb were dropped on your city

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Hiroshima 70 Years on: Survivors Remember Horror of Nuclear Bomb

Understanding the magnitude of the Hiroshima atomic blast is difficult to imagine if it can't be put into perspective.

The incredibly high number of casualties and injuries, including the ones exposed to radiation gives us only hints on the scale of the impact, which according to a report release by the US Army after the attack amounts to more than 130,000. In fact, according to the Princeton University Press, a nuclear explosion causes massive damage when the energy is released between the thermal radiation (35%), the blast (50%) and the nuclear radiation (15%).

First a fireball expands while transforming all matter into gas at several million degrees. The vaporized matter condenses into a radioactive cloud and pressure waves start moving outwards forming the air blast, which, together with the heat wave wipes out everything in the bomb's range. On top of all this, the nuclear fallout impacts any living being in a wide surrounding area, affecting entire generations with its effects on the genetic patterns.

To help understand the impact of a nuclear blast, the closest private approximation might be a simulator called Nukemap, which embarked on the task of providing us with context around the harm that such an event could cause.

The website lets you select your city, pick a type of bomb and the way of delivery, and hit detonate. The map will show the blast radius broken down into fireball, air blast and thermal radiation area. The program will calculate the number of casualties based on how many people live in the selected city and the amount of injuries.

The project is supported by the College of Arts and Letters at the Stevens Institute of Technology.

See the photo gallery below for a look back on Hiroshima:
13 PHOTOS
Looking back: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima
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This website shows you what the aftermath would be if an atomic bomb were dropped on your city
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Hiroshima after the dropping of the atom bomb in August 1945. USAF photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Survivors of the explosion of the Atom bomb at Hiroshima 1945 suffering the effects of radiation. ICRC photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, firestorms after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage at Hiroshima with a burnt out fire engine amidst the rubble. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
World War II, Human shadow on bank steps, in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945 Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, shadow of a tap on a pipeline at Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
6th August 1945: The twisted wreckage of a theatre, located 800 metres from the epicentre of the atomic explosion at Hiroshima. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN: This September 1945 file picture shows the remaining of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industry Promotion Building, known as the Atomic-Bomb Dome, which was later preserved as a monument. (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 26: Atomic Bomb Dome stands among fallen autumn leaves at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on November 26, 2014 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images)
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