Michigan bookstore offers refunds on Harper Lee's 'Go Set a Watchmen'

Michigan Bookstore Offers Refunds for Harper Lee's "Go Set A Watchman"

A Michigan bookstore is offering refunds on Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchmen."

The reason? They say it doesn't feel like a prequel or a sequel to To Kill A Mockingbird, nor does it feel like a new book. They say instead that it feels like "a first draft that was originally, and rightfully, rejected."

The owner goes on to say:

"We are not offering refunds based on the quality of the (Harper Lee) book or its content. We are offering refunds to those who bought the book based on marketing that led them to believe it was something other than what it actually was ... If you find yourself complicit in misleading a customer, you should make amends. Again, this isn't about whether they liked the book. Its about being misled by the marketing."

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Michigan bookstore offers refunds on Harper Lee's 'Go Set a Watchmen'
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: Pulitzer Prize winner and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' author Harper Lee smiles before receiving the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: U.S. President George W. Bush (L) greets Harper Lee (C), Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of 'To Kill A Mockingbird,' after he presented her with a Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony for the 2007 recipients in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, in local courthouse while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, in her father's law office while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee with her father. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Get your first look at our cover for Harper Lee’s #GoSetAWatchman. http://t.co/AUp2W1j0lE http://t.co/SG5QBMMYLN
We are thrilled to share the official cover of Harper Lee's #GoSetaWatchman with you all! @GSAWatchmanBook http://t.co/RJlkUuhgQW
Harper Lee wrote me back today to say "Go Away!" Happy UK #WBD2015 #WorldBookDay http://t.co/GozIGKKfGf http://t.co/usnDehHSjs
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
394238 02: Shoppers read about a Chicago program involving the 40th anniversary edition of Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize winning novel 'To Kill A Mockingbird' September 10, 2001 at a Borders Books and Music store in Chicago. Borders Books and Music in Chicago is working with the City of Chicago and the Chicago Public Library in the new citywide reading initiative: 'One Book, One Chicago,' encouraging all Chicagoans to read and discuss the book during the months of September and October. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)
A struggle takes place between Jem and Scout Finch (Phillip Alford and Mary Badham, centre) in a 'To Kill A Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
Publicity still portrait of American actor Brock Peters in the film 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' 1962. (Photo by John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Archive/Getty Images)
Left to right: Estelle Evans (1906 - 1985) as Calpurnia, Phillip Alford as Jem and Mary Badham as Scout, in 'To Kill A Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
American actors Gregory Peck (1916 - 2003), as Atticus Finch, and Mary Badham as Scout, in 'To Kill A Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
American actors (left to right) Gregory Peck (1916 - 2003) as Atticus Finch, John Megna (1952 - 1995) as Charles Baker 'Dill' Harris, Phillip Alford as Jem Finch, and Mary Badham as Scout Finch in 'To Kill A Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
American actor Robert Duvall as Arthur 'Boo' Radley in a promotional portrait for 'To Kill a Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
American actor Gregory Peck (1916 - 2003) as Atticus Finch in 'To Kill A Mockingbird', directed by Robert Mulligan, 1962. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)
The lawyer Atticus Finch as interpreted by Gregory Peck, seated on the sofa together with his two children. Burbank, California, 1962. (Photo by Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images)
Rosemary Murphy sitting with Mary Badham and other children in a scene from the film 'To Kill A Mockingbird', 1962. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images)
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