Rachel Dolezal opens up to Vanity Fair: 'I didn't deceive anyone'

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Rachel Dolezal Tells Vanity Fair: "I Didn't Deceive Anybody"

Rachel Dolezal is back in the news, with a revealing new interview with Vanity Fair.

Dolezal made headlines in June for portraying herself as an African American woman, even though she was born to white parents. She told the magazine:

"I just feel like I didn't mislead anybody; I didn't deceive anybody. If people feel misled or deceived, then sorry that they feel that way, but I believe that's more due to their definition and construct of race in their own minds than it is to my integrity or honesty, because I wouldn't say I'm African American, but I would say I'm black, and there's a difference in those terms."

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Rachel Dolezal opens up to Vanity Fair: 'I didn't deceive anyone'
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Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal is seen in the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (R) hugs family member Izaiah Dolezal after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
Washington state civil rights advocate Rachel Dolezal (C) smiles toward family member Izaiah Dolezal (L) while her son Franklin (R) stands nearby after her interview on the NBC's "Today" show studios in Manhattan, New York June 16, 2015. Dolezal, who has been accused of falsely claiming she is African-American, said on Tuesday she identifies as black and has been doing so since she was 5 years of age. Dolezal, in an interview on NBC's "Today" television show, said a major shift in her identity came when she was doing human rights work in Idaho and newspaper stories described her as transracial, biracial and black. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
People cheer during a protest in front of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) headquarters in Spokane, Washington June 15, 2015. Rachel Dolezal, a civil rights advocate who has been accused of falsely claiming she is black, announced her resignation on Monday as leader of a local branch of the NAACP in Washington state. REUTERS/David Ryder
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She also told the magazine that her appearance is going to stay as-is, saying that it is:

"Not a costume... I've had my years of confusion and wondering who I really [was] and why and how do I live my life and make sense of it all, but I'm not confused about that any longer. I think the world might be—but I'm not."

Dolezal stepped down from her leadership role with the Spokane, Washington N-A-A-C-P chapter in June after her parents revealed to a local newspaper that she was born white, igniting a national discussion over what it means to be black.

Dolezal also says she's having a tough time with money, as she lost both her jobs after the media firestorm.

She resigned from her role with the Spokane chapter of the NAACP, and her part time teaching job with the Africana studies department at Eastern Washington University.

But she is earning money doing hair. She says she has appointments to do braids and weaves a few times a week. And, of course, she plans to write a book. She told Vanity Fair:

"I don't feel like I am probably going to be able to re-enter that work with the type of leadership required to make change if I don't have something like a published explanation."

The question is - will even that be good enough?

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