Spanish town's summer advice: don't skip your siesta

Mayor Establishes an Official Daily Naptime for Entire Town

MADRID (AP) — The heat is on, and a Spanish town is taking its afternoon siesta seriously.

Every summer day in Ador, a small farming town in eastern Spain, a policeman reads out a town hall proclamation recommending that locals observe the traditional siesta period between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.

The advice, given over a loudspeaker system, encourages people to keep children indoors and turn down the volume of TV sets and music equipment.

Mayor Joan Faus told The Associated Press on Friday that locals are not legally required to observe the siesta period. But he said the town hall strongly recommends they stay indoors because "at that time of day it is dangerous to be outside" because of the summer heat.

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Spanish town's summer advice: don't skip your siesta
People cool off in a fountain in Cordoba on June 29, 2015. Spain's national weather office placed Cordoba, on red alert, the highest level in the scale, meaning soaring temperatures posed an 'extreme risk' to health. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / CRISTINA QUICLER (Photo credit should read CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images)
A couple hug each other among the water streams of a fountain as they cool off in Cordoba on June 29, 2015. Spain's national weather office placed Cordoba, on red alert, the highest level in the scale, meaning soaring temperatures posed an 'extreme risk' to health. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / CRISTINA QUICLER (Photo credit should read CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman rides her bike through water streams in a fountain to cool her off in Cordoba on June 29, 2015. Spain's national weather office placed Cordoba, on red alert, the highest level in the scale, meaning soaring temperatures posed an 'extreme risk' to health. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / CRISTINA QUICLER (Photo credit should read CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman shakes her hair after cooling off in a fountain in Cordoba on June 29, 2015. Spain's national weather office placed Cordoba, on red alert, the highest level in the scale, meaning soaring temperatures posed an 'extreme risk' to health. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / CRISTINA QUICLER (Photo credit should read CRISTINA QUICLER/AFP/Getty Images)
Holidaymakers walk next to a security sign at Cascais' beach on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
Holidaymakers protect from the sun in the shade of the beach umbrellas in the tourist village of Cascais' beach on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
A tourist uses an umbrella to protect from the sun as she goes for a walk by Cascais' beach on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
A man sunbathes next to the beach of the tourist village of Cascais on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
Holidaymakers row on their stand up paddle surfboards in the tourist village of Cascais on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
Four men sunbathe on a beach of the tourist village of Cascais on the outskirts of Lisbon on June 29, 2015. Temperatures soared above 40 degrees (104 degrees Fahrenheit) across Spain and Portugal on June 29, 2015, prompting heat alerts, raising the risk of wildfires and drawing crowds to beaches and fountains. AFP PHOTO / JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO (Photo credit should read JOSE MANUEL RIBEIRO/AFP/Getty Images)
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Spain has endured two heat waves already in July, with temperatures exceeding 40 degrees Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) in some areas. In the region of Ador, which has some 1,400 inhabitants, the summer heat is often unbearable, Faus said.

"From 11 a.m. onwards you can't be in the street or out in the field," he said. "All you can see are snakes and lizards and other nasty creatures. The heat is suffocating."

The siesta, or afternoon nap, is a famous Spanish tradition, though the custom has largely been lost in major cities. In the countryside, however, it is still common, especially in summer.

Faus said town authorities and other nearby municipalities have been issuing the recommendations for years.

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