#ThisIsACoup is trending on Twitter after the Greek debt deal

Tusk: 'After 17 Hours We Have a Deal'

Greece finally reached a deal with its creditors to receive a much-needed bailout, but a lot of people are unhappy with the deal.

The hashtag #ThisIsACoup is currently trending on Twitter and commentators are lashing out at what they see as an unfair deal for Greece. The big issue is that all the signs coming out of negotiations so far suggest that the reforms the Eurogroup has asked for will be more austere than those rejected by the Greek people in the country's recent referendum.

That's because the country's economy has deteriorated even more in the interim, meaning greater action is required, and Greece is close to running out of cash, meaning it's desperate for a deal and in a weak negotiating position.

People are also unhappy with the level of power the Eurogroup has over Greece in the new deal.

Here's a selection of some of the #ThisIsACoup tweets people are sending out:



While he didn't use the hashtag, Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft tweeted something similar to the views expressed by #ThisIsACoup tweeters last night:

Watching the Greek debacle it is difficult to conclude that it is a Sovereign nation anymore....

SEE: Greece after the referendum:

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Greece after the referendum
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#ThisIsACoup is trending on Twitter after the Greek debt deal
ATHENS, GREECE - JULY 13: Pensioners talk to bank staff as they wait to collect their pensions outside a National Bank of Greece branch in Kotzia Square on July 13, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Eurozone leaders have reportedly made an 'agreement' on the Greek debt crisis in Brussels. After lengthy talks EU President Donald Tusk tweeted that a bailout programme was 'all ready to go'. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
A woman burns the flag of the ruling party Syriza, surrounded by journalists, in front of the Greek parliament in Athens, during an anti-EU demonstration in Athens calling for a no to any agreement with the creditors on July 13 , 2015. Eurozone leaders struck a deal on a bailout to prevent debt-stricken Greece from crashing out of the euro forcing Athens to push through draconian reforms in a matter of days. AFP PHOTO/ LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Leftist protester holds a greek flag in front of the Greek parliament as they take part an anti-EU demonstration in Athens calling for a 'NO' to any agreement with the creditors on July 13, 2015. Eurozone leaders struck a deal Monday on a bailout to prevent debt-stricken Greece from crashing out of the euro, forcing Athens to push through draconian reforms in a matter of days. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLARO (Photo credit should read ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images)
People read newspaper headlines in central Athens on July 13, 2015. Greece reached a desperately-needed bailout deal with the eurozone on July 13 after marathon overnight talks, in a historic agreement to prevent the country crashing out of the European single currency. The country's leftist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras agreed to tough reforms after 17 hours of gruelling negotiations in return for a three-year bailout worth up to 86 billion euros ($96 billion), Greece's third rescue programme in five years. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Click here to see more #ThisIsACoup tweets.

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