TV Land yanks 'Dukes of Hazzard' amid Confederate flag backlash

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TV Land Pulls 'Dukes of Hazzard' Episodes Amid Confederate Flag Uproar

By Variety:

Reruns of "The Dukes of Hazzard" have been quietly pulled from TV Land's daytime schedule at a moment of heightened sensitivity to Confederate flag imagery.

The Warner Bros.-produced series that aired on CBS from 1979-85 revolves around two Southern cousins who race around their small town in a souped-up 1969 Dodge Charger, dubbed the General Lee, with the Confederate flag emblazoned on the hood. TV Land pulled the show on Monday, a rep confirmed.

TV Land declined to elaborate on the decision but it is clearly a response to the broader movement to withdraw the flag from official settings and in pop culture, given its historic connection to slavery and the Civil War. The push to remove Confederate flags and Stars and Bars icons came last month in the wake of the slayings of nine African-Americans in a Charleston church, by a suspected 21-year-old white supremacist.

After the governor of South Carolina called for the flag's removal from the state's capital last month, numerous entities pledged to stop manufacturing or distributing items with Confederate flag imagery. Warner Bros. was among them as it still maintains a line of "Dukes of Hazzard" merchandise.

See photos of the protests against the flag:

9 PHOTOS
Confederate flag protests in SC
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TV Land yanks 'Dukes of Hazzard' amid Confederate flag backlash
Hundreds of people gather for a protest rally against the Confederate flag in Columbia, South Carolina on June 20, 2015. The racially divisive Confederate battle flag flew at full-mast despite others flying at half-staff in South Carolina after the killing of nine black people in an historic African-American church in Charleston on June 17. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white male suspected of carrying out the Emanuel African Episcopal Methodist Church bloodbath, was one of many southern Americans who identified with the 13-star saltire in red, white and blue. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 23: Ernest Branch (L) hugs a man carrying a Confederate flag (who didn't want to provide his name) saying, that he respects the fact the guy likes the flag but that he is against the flag flying on the Capitol grounds on June 23, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The South Carolina governor Nikki Haley asked that the flag be removed afer debate over the flag flying on the capitol grounds was kicked off after nine people were shot and killed during a prayer meeting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley hugs U.S. Congressman James Clyburn after she called for legislators to remove the Confederate flag from the grounds of the State House during a press conference on Monday, June 22, 2015, in Columbia, S.C. (Tim Dominick/The State/TNS via Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 23: Asha Jones attends a protest in support of a Confederate flags removal from the South Carolina capitol grounds on June 23, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The South Carolina governor Nikki Haley asked that the flag be removed after debate over the flag flying on the capitol grounds was kicked off after nine people were shot and killed during a prayer meeting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 23: Sonya Anderson asks for the removal of the confederate flag as she attends a protest in support of a confederate flags removal from the South Carolina capitol grounds on June 23, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. The South Carolina governor Nikki Haley asked that the flag be removed after debate over the flag flying on the capitol grounds was kicked off after nine people were shot and killed during a prayer meeting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 20: Anti-Confederate flag protesters demonstrate outside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church where nine people were shot to death earlier this week June 20, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Suspect Dylann Roof, 21, was arrested and charged in the killing of nine people during a prayer meeting in the church, one of the nation's oldest black churches in the South. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A man wears a t-shirt representing the Confederate flag as hundreds of people gather for a protest rally against the Confederate flag in Columbia, South Carolina on June 20, 2015. The racially divisive Confederate battle flag flew at full-mast despite others flying at half-staff in South Carolina after the killing of nine black people in an historic African-American church in Charleston on June 17. Dylann Roof, the 21-year-old white male suspected of carrying out the Emanuel African Episcopal Methodist Church bloodbath, was one of many southern Americans who identified with the 13-star saltire in red, white and blue. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 22: The Confederate flag flies on the Capitol grounds after South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley announced that she will call for the Confederate flag to be removed on June 22, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina. Debate over the flag flying at the Capitol was again ignited off after nine people were shot and killed during a prayer meeting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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