Greece defaults on IMF payment despite last-minute overtures to creditors

A 'Yes' Rally in Athens

Greece made last-minute overtures to its international creditors for financial aid on Tuesday, but it was not enough to save the country from becoming the first developed economy to default on a loan with the International Monetary Fund.

The left-wing Greek government had asked European partners for a two-year aid package to cover its financing needs. Later on Tuesday, Greece's Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis indicated on a call with European counterparts that Athens might scrap a controversial July 5th referendum if a deal was reached, according to euro zone sources.

The flurry of diplomacy was an attempt to bring creditors back into talks after five months of inconclusive negotiations brought Greece close to leaving the euro currency bloc.

It came as tens of thousands of people descended on Athens' central Syntagma square over the past 24 hours in two different rallies - one to support the government and the other to push for Greece to remain in the euro.

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Greece defaults on IMF payment despite last-minute overtures to creditors
ATHENS, GREECE - JULY 03: Pensioners without ATM cards wait in queue outside a bank branch to withdraw money from their pension funds on July 03, 2015 in Athens, Greece. (Photo by Salih Baran/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Pensioners wait outside a closed branch of the Greek National bank in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 29: People wait in line to withdraw 60 euros from an ATM after Greece closed its banks on June 29, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece closed its banks and imposed capital controls on Sunday to monitor the growing strains on its crippled financial system, bringing the prospect of being forced out of the euro into plain sight. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A man withdraws the withdrawal limit of 60 euros at an ATM machine in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Pensioners queue outside a closed branch of the Greek National bank in Thessaloniki on June 29, 2015 as Greece ordered its banks to shut for one week and imposed capital controls today, sending markets tumbling after its citizens emptied ATMs on the eve of a potentially disastrous default. In a ray of hope, creditors left the door open to Greece for a last-ditch debt deal, in order to try and avert a dangerous default that could spark a Greek eurozone exit and raise serious questions about the future of the European Union. AFP PHOTO / SAKIS MITROLIDIS (Photo credit should read SAKIS MITROLIDIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Foreign anti-EU activists protest in front of the Greek parliament in Athens, during a demonstration calling for 'NO' at referendum and for Greece's exit from the eurozone on June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras stunned Europe late Friday with a surprise call for a July 5 referendum on the latest cash-for-reforms package and advised voters against backing a deal that he said spelled further 'humiliation'..AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 28: People wait in a queue in front of a bank's ATM to withdraw their cash in Athens, Greece on June 28, 2015. Greeks are anxious about whether the European Central Bank will increase the emergency liquidity assistance, banks can draw on from the country's central bank or not. (Photo by Ayhan Mehmet/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building on June 21, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Greek Presidential Guard conducts his ceremonial march as protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building on June 21, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 21: Protesters attend an anti-austerity pro-government rally in front of the parliament building in Athens, Greece, June 21, 2015. Greece's leftwing government believes it can reach a deal with its creditors on Monday. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 3: A Greek flag billows in the wind on the Acropolis Hill on June 3, 2015, in Athens, Greece. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras is expected to be presented with the international creditors' plan of tough economic reforms for Greece in order to unlock 7.2 billion Euros of rescue loans later today. It is unclear whether Greece will accept the offer, as Tsipras has previously called for his own proposals to be considered by the creditors (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: View of the index in the Hellenic Exchange office on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15:.Woman pass by Hellenic Exchange office in Athens on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images))
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: View of the index in the Hellenic Exchange office on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A woman walks past Bank of Greece headquarters in central Athens on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Locals visit the Green market on June 15 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Pensioners play backgammon in front of closed shop on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Women buy on cheep clothing at a flea market on June 15 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
A man walks past graffiti featuring the word 'Time' but using the Euro sign in place of the letter 'e'on a wall in Athens on June 15, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras insisted in an oped piece in a Greek newspaper on June 15, 2015 that Athens would 'wait patiently' until the International Monetary Fund and the European Union became 'more realistic', a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed, bringing the threat of a Greek exit from the euro closer than ever. AFP PHOTO/ LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
An elderly men stands outside the Athens central market on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ Louisa Gouliamaki (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 15: Local people pass by graffiti that says 'Greece vs Everybody' on June 15, 2015 in Athens, Greece. The European Commission has said that Greece and its international creditors need to come to an agreement within the next 2 weeks to avoid a possible default, after weekend talks collapsed. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
People read newspaper's headlines in central Athens on June 15, 2015. Athens will patiently wait until its creditors become realistic, Greece's premier said, a day after last-ditch talks between the two sides collapsed and raised fears that Athens would default and exit the eurozone. AFP PHOTO/ Louisa Gouliamaki (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Greece, as expected, was not able to repay 1.6 billion euros it owed to the International Monetary Fund, in what was the largest missed payment in the Fund's history.

Late on Tuesday, the IMF said it would examine a Greek request for a payment extension in due course.

The latest Greek proposals came too late to prevent Greece's existing aid package - with locked-up funds it needs to pay wages, salaries and debt - from expiring.

Still, in a sign that European officials have not given up on finding a solution for Greece, finance ministers said they would confer on Wednesday over Tsipras' latest loan request, effectively coming back to the negotiating table.

Sources said the officials are expected to discuss on Wednesday Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras' request for the new two-year loan to pay debts that amount to nearly 30 billion euros. Tsipras is also seeking debt restructuring, an issue on which lenders have so far been reluctant to compromise.

It was unclear how much the Wednesday call could achieve. Trust between Athens and European capitals is in tatters after acrimonious talks. The relationship further deteriorated after Athens on Saturday decided to put creditors' proposals for reforms in exchange for financial aid to a July 5th referendum.

The 40-year-old premier says the plebiscite is the democratic way for Greeks to say whether they will accept more budget cuts and taxes in order to maintain international aid. He has been urging people to vote against it, angering creditors.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has ruled out further negotiations until after Sunday's referendum.

Jeroen Dijsselbloem, chairman of the euro zone's group of finance ministers, warned that Athens was welcome to ask for new aid but that it would come with conditions.

"What can change is the political stance of the Greek government that has led to this unfortunate situation," Dijsselbloem said.

In what appeared to be an effort to gain traction with his counterparts, Varoufakis indicated during the call late on Tuesday that Athens might call off the referendum or urge Greeks to vote in favor of bailout terms if a deal on a new loan was reached, according to euro zone sources.

A Greek official said that, as of late Tuesday, there were no changes in the planned referendum.

DEFAULT

Greece has received nearly 240 billion euros in two bailouts from the European Union and International Monetary Fund since 2010. The money has allowed the country to stay afloat but at a high cost to its population, which has swallowed many austerity measures such as cuts to pensions, wages and public services.

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