Decisions in last 3 Supreme Court cases expected Monday

The Historic Ruling on Same-Sex Mriage


Meeting on Monday for the final time until the fall, the Supreme Court has three cases remaining to be decided:

—Lethal injection: Death-row inmates in Oklahoma are objecting to the use of the sedative midazolam in lethal-injection executions after the drug was implicated in several botched executions. Their argument is that the drug does not reliably induce a coma-like sleep that would prevent them from experiencing the searing pain of the paralytic and heart-stopping drugs that follow sedation.

—Independent redistricting commissions: Roughly a dozen states have adopted independent commissions to reduce partisan politics in drawing congressional districts. The case from Arizona involves a challenge from Republican state lawmakers who complain that they can't be completely cut out of the process without violating the Constitution.

—Mercury emissions: Industry groups and Republican-led states assert that environmental regulators overstepped their bounds by coming up with expensive limits on the emissions of mercury and other toxic pollutants from power plants without taking account of the cost of regulation at the start of the process. The first limits on mercury emissions, more than a decade in the making, began to take effect in April.

The justices also could say Monday whether they will take on important cases for the term that begins in October on abortion, affirmative action and the power of unions that represent government workers.

PHOTOS: Interns hand-deliver decided SCOTUS rulings in "the running of the interns":

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The running of the interns, Supreme Court
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Decisions in last 3 Supreme Court cases expected Monday
An intern runs an opinion to colleagues in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, June 22, 2015. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
A television intern runs to her reporter stationed outside after being handed the ruling on the Affordable Care Act, at the US Supreme Court June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court ruled that the Affordable Care Act may provide nationwide tax subsidies to help poor and middle-class people buy health insurance. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
A news intern runs out of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 18, 2015, to deliver information of a court decision. (Photo by Jim Watson via AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the news media, including interns for network television stations, run with decisions in hand on the opinion for health care outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday June 25, 2015, in an official tradition referred to as the 'running of the interns.' The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)
Interns run the Obamacare tax subsidies opinion to colleagues after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to save Obamacare tax subsidies outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 25, 2015. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the nationwide tax subsidies that are a core component of President Barack Obama's health-care law rejecting a challenge that had threatened to gut the measure and undercut his legacy. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Television interns and producers run to their reporters after a court decision was released at the U.S. Supreme Court June 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. his week the high court is releasing several decisions and are expected to hand down its ruling on gay marriage and Obamacare subsidies by the end of the week. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Members of the news media, including interns for network television stations, run with decisions in hand on the opinion for health care outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Thursday June 25, 2015, in an official tradition referred to as the 'running of the interns.' The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)
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