Nikki Haley, Lindsey Graham will reportedly call for taking down confederate flag

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After Charleston, the Confederate Flag Is Still Flying High

(NY Mag) -- The Post and Courier reports that South Carolina governor Nikki Haley will likely call for taking down the Confederate flag in front of the state capitol at a press conference at 4 p.m. on Monday. CNN reports that Senator Lindsey Graham, who is running for the Republican presidential nomination, will join her during the press conference and say the exact same thing.

The flag is currently padlocked into place and can only be taken down if the state legislature votes to do so; an earlier legislative decision in 2000 moved the flag from its place on top of the state capitol to a lower spot at the Confederate memorial on the capitol grounds.

Activists and many high-profile national politicians have called for South Carolina to remove the flag in the past week. A bipartisan group of local politicians from the Charleston area held a press conference on Mondaycalling for it to come down.

Republican House speaker Jay Lucas released a statement today saying, "Wednesday's unspeakable tragedy has reignited a discussion on this sensitive issue that holds a long and complicated history in the Palmetto State. Moving South Carolina forward from this terrible tragedy requires a swift resolution of this issue." This year's legislative session ended on June 4, but the lawmakers are still working out a budget. The lawmakers could include a sentence or two in the budget that could call for the flag to be removed until the issue could be brought up more fully next year.

13 PHOTOS
Bridge march in Charleston to protest shooting
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Nikki Haley, Lindsey Graham will reportedly call for taking down confederate flag
People join hands on Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thousands of people march on The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, South Carolina on June 21, 2015. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Thousands of people march on The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, South Carolina on June 21, 2015. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Thousands of people hold hands to form a human chain on The Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, South Carolina on June 21, 2015. Thousands marched in Charleston where nine African Americans were gunned down, as a chilling website apparently created by the suspected white supremacist shooter emerged. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray on Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People observe nine minutes of silence on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People return to Charleston after joining hands across Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People pray as other walk on Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People observe nine minutes of silence on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People greet each other after crossing from opposite ends of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People cross the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. People crossed the Bridge from Mount Pleasant and Charleston to join hands in a unity chain to mourn the 9 victims of the Emanuel AME Church shooting. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: People pray together after forming a 'unity chain' across the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge over the Cooper River June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. The march was organized to commemorate the nine people shot to death last Wednesday at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church by a 21-year-old white supremacist who claimed to want to start a race war. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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Republican representative Doug Brannon said this weekend that he planned to sponsor a bill during the next legislative session to move the flag to the Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum. "I just didn't have the balls for five years to do it," he told the Associated Press. "But when my friend was assassinated for being nothing more than a black man, I decided it was time for that thing to be off the Statehouse grounds. It's not just a symbol of hate, it's actually a symbol of pride in one's hatred."

Haley mostly evaded questions about the flag last week, noting that she had no authority to do anything without the legislature's input. "To start having policy conversations with the people of South Carolina, I understand that's what y'all want. My job is to heal the people of this state," she told CBS.

Graham told CNN only a few days ago that the flag "works here, that's what the statehouse agreed to do. You could probably visit other places in the country near some symbol that doesn't quite strike you right."

16 PHOTOS
First service in Charleston church since shootings
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Nikki Haley, Lindsey Graham will reportedly call for taking down confederate flag
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Jimmy Guyton participates at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners cry and embrace as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: People kneel during a prayer at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Juliett Marsh, of Washington, D.C., listens from the balcony at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff speaks at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners pray as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners cry and embrace as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff speaks at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners pray as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners Shakur Francis, left, and Karen Watson-Fleming sing as they attend the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Parishioners sing four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of Pinckney and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: An organist plays music as parishioners take their seats at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of it's pastor and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: Church member Kevin Polite, right, helps members into the church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of it's pastor and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: The Rev. Norvel Goff, right, prays at the empty seat of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney at the Emanuel A.M.E. Church four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of Pinckney and eight others at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by David Goldman-Pool/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 21: People pay respects outside at the first church service four days after a mass shooting that claimed the lives of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Church June 21, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina. Chruch elders decided to hold the regularly scheduled Sunday school and worship service as they continue to grieve the shooting death of nine of its members including its pastor earlier this week. (Photo by Paul Zoeller-Pool/Getty Images)
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