Researchers find most kangaroos are left-handed

Researchers Find Kangaroos Are Left-Handed


For years, researchers had thought that handedness was unique to great apes, including humans, but scientists at Saint Petersburg State University in Russia have learned kangaroos possess the trait as well.

Among kangaroos, the appendage used most often is the left one. This was learned through a lot of observation and documentation. Among the particular wildkangaroos the team tracked were the Goodfellow's tree, the red, and the eastern gray.

The researchers also spent some time watching the activities of the red-necked wallaby.

Notes were kept on which hand the animals used when performing varying tasks such as cleaning themselves and eating.

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Rare albino kangaroos
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Researchers find most kangaroos are left-handed
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Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia. (Photo via Getty)

Rare albino kangaroo came into the world in May in Osijek ZOO, the last few weeks has ventured to go from mother and explore it enclosure. (Photo: Marko Mrkonjic/PIXSELL)
A rare albino kangaroo appears camouflaged against the coral sands of Lovers' Cove on Daydream Island in the Whitsundays archipelago off Queensland on July 11, 2010. Albinism (from Latin albus, 'white') is a congenital disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of pigment in the hair due to the absence of an enzyme involved in the production of melanin and results from inheritance of the recessive gene alleles. (Photo by Torsten Blackwood, AFP/Getty Images)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. (Photo via Getty)
Kangaroo with baby joey
Rare albino kangaroo came into the world in May in Osijek ZOO, the last few weeks has ventured to go from mother and explore it enclosure. (Photo: Marko Mrkonjic/PIXSELL)
Albino and brown kangaroo on green grass
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An overwhelming preference for the left hand was observed, although in some less consistently than in others.

While scientists have found some evidence of various species displaying handedness in a lesser degree, until now, it has not been found to be as pronounced as it is in humans.

Scientists believe it may have to do with the ability to walk on two legs, leaving the hands free to become more specialized.
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