UN takes day to globally recognize children victims


The International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression first came about in August 19, 1982, and now, 33 years later, every June 4, the world is still acknowledging the innocent children who have suffered through physical, mental and emotional abuse. The internationally recognized day was created to affirm the UN's commitment to protecting the rights of children around the world.

Ultimately, the day aims to celebrate the individuals and organizations that make an effort to defend and preserve the rights of children around the world. Organizations and foundations such as the Malala Fund and the Global Movement for Children have spoken up to take a stand for innocent children. The 'Say YES for Children' campaign, which launched in 2001, asked millions of people through the world to pledge their support for the Rallying Call for the Global Movement for Children.

The campaign specifically focused on 10 main principles that aimed at protecting and preserving the lives of children, including education, fighting HIV/aids, and fighting poverty. 'Say Yes for Children' sparked international debate on child rights both nationally and globally, initiating important conversations about children's rights. See the slideshow below for photos of children who have been victims of war and conflict:

8 PHOTOS
International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression
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UN takes day to globally recognize children victims
Palestinian mourners attend the funeral procession of victims of Israeli bombardments, including children, in Beit Lahia, northern Gaza Strip.
A Yemeni child lays in a bed at a hospital in the capital Sanaa on May 12, 2015, a day after she was wounded in an air strike by Saudi-led coalition warplanes on an arms depot in the Mount Noqum area on the eastern outskirts of Sanaa. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED HUWAIS (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A wounded Syrian boy speaks to his friend at a makeshift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes on the city on May 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY (Photo credit should read ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
A Yemeni child receives treatment on April 1, 2015, at the burn unit of a hospital in Yemeni capital of Sanaa, following a reported airstrike by the Saudi-led coalitions in the area of Yarim south of the capital the day before. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED HUWAIS (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP/Getty Images)
GRAPHIC CONTENT A wounded Syrian boy reacts as he receives treatment at a clinic in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces on February 9, 2015. Tens of thousands of residents trapped in the rebel bastion suffer from food and medical shortages, as well as deadly regime bombardment. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY (Photo credit should read ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
A wounded Syrian child receives treatment at a makeshift hospital in the rebel held area of Douma, north east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad on January 25, 2015. In central Damascus, five civilians and two soldiers were also killed and dozens of people wounded when rebels fired a barrage of rockets and mortar rounds, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY (Photo credit should read ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
GRAPHIC CONTENT An injured boy looks on as he is being treated at a makeshift hospital in the besieged rebel bastion of Douma, northeast of the Syrian capital Damascus, on September 24, 2014, following reported airstrikes by government forces. Some 191,000 people have been killed since an uprising against President Bashar al-Assad's rule erupted in March 2011. AFP PHOTO/ ABD DOUMANY (Photo credit should read ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
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