TSA failed 95 percent of undercover security tests

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Report: TSA Screeners Failed 95-Percent of Security Tests

WASHINGTON (WGN) – According to a government official, Transportation Security Administration agents failed undercover tests designed to challenge their ability to identify explosives or weapons.

"Red Teams" from the Department of Homeland Security posed as passengers and tried to pass through security with explosives or weapons.

TSA officers failed 67 out of 70 tests, allowing the items through.

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TSA failed 95 percent of undercover security tests
Journalist Justin Gray stopped by TSA agent who didn't know District of Columbia was in US --> http://t.co/44svhkryP7 http://t.co/VzhaYcgRdY
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - MAY 23: A TSA agent checks luggage as passengers arrive for flights at O'Hare International Airport May 23, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Chicago's O'Hare and Midway International Airports expect 1.5 million passengers over a six-day travel period covering Memorial Day weekend beginning Thursday, May 22 and running through Tuesday, May 27. AAA forecasts the number of drivers taking to the roads for the holiday will hit a 10-year high, with roughly eight in ten Americans taking road trips during the long weekend. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
BOSTON - MAY 13: At Logan Airport Terminal a sign points to the new TSA New Pre Check Enrollment Center at Logan Airport. The TSA Administrator John S. Pistole was on hand to introduce the new center. (Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 01: Luggage moves through a new explosives detection system at the Newark Liberty International Airport on May 1, 2014 in New York City. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), now uses the automated in-line baggage system at the airport's Terminal C. The system uses about a mile of conveyor belts to automatically screen, sort and track baggage. Nine explosives detection machines can screen more than 600 pieces of luggage per hour. If a bag requires additional screening, it is automatically diverted to a separate room where it is manually screened by TSA officers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 20: A TSA arm patch is seen at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on February 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson is viewing Transportation Security Administration security operations and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Federal Inspection Facility at LAX, and will meet with the Joint Regional Intelligence Center in Los Angeles on his two-day visit to southern California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 20: Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson greets TSA agents after addressing a press conference at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on February 20, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Johnson is viewing Transportation Security Administration security operations and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Federal Inspection Facility at LAX, and will meet with the Joint Regional Intelligence Center in Los Angeles on his two-day visit to southern California. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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The numbers come from a DHS Inspector General report. A separate government official said that report is still being written and was not set to be issued until later this summer.

A DHS spokesperson said, "Aviation security involves a number of measures, both seen and unseen, and we are constantly testing, measuring and enhancing our capabilities and techniques as the threat evolves."

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