A look at the 7 officials arrested in the FIFA raids

14 FIFA Officials Face Extradition to USA Over Corruption Allegations

Here is a look at the seven soccer officials arrested in Switzerland on warrants issued by the U.S. Justice Department after a corruption probe involving FIFA members. All seven are connected with the regional confederations of North and South America and face up to 20 years in prison if convicted. Authorities want them extradited to the United States:

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Jeffrey Webb, Cayman Islands

He is a vice president and an executive committee member of FIFA, as well as the president of CONCACAF, the governing body for soccer in North America, the Caribbean and Central America.

The 50-year-old Webb is also an executive committee member for the Caribbean Football Union and the president of the Cayman Islands Football Association. He is a lawyer and banker in the Cayman Islands, and has been mentioned by FIFA President Sepp Blatter as his possible successor as president at the world governing body.

Webb became CONCACAF president after replacing Jack Warner, who resigned amid corruption allegations in 2011. Warner also resigned from his FIFA vice-presidency at the time.

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Eugenio Figueredo, Uruguay

He is a vice president and an executive committee member of FIFA, as well as a former president of CONMEBOL, soccer's governing body in South America. He was CONMEBOL's vice president for nearly a decade, and is also a former president of the Uruguayan soccer federation.

The 83-year-old Figueredo was ahead of South American soccer since 2013, after former president Nicolas Leoz resigned citing health problems while under investigation for corruption. His tenure at CONMEBOL ended last year and he was eventually appointed a chairman of the World Cup organizing committee for FIFA.

A former athlete, salesman and sports journalist, Figueredo was the president of the Uruguayan federation from 1997-2006. He was accused of benefiting his own club, Huracan Buceo, and last year a Uruguayan judge requested an investigation into Figueredo after accusations of wrongdoing related to television deals.


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A look at the 7 officials arrested in the FIFA raids
Swiss attorney General Michael Lauber attends a press conference on June 17, 2015 in Bern. Swiss authorities are investigating the 2010 FIFA vote that awarded the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 tournament to Qatar. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - DECEMBER 07: Chuck Blazer Chairman of the Organising Committee for the FIFA Club World Cup talks to the media during the FIFA Club World Cup Organising Committee Press Conference at Nagoya Marriott Associa Hotel on December 7, 2011 in Nagoya, Japan. (Photo by Shaun Botterill - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: An FBI agent wearing a mask carries a box from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes and computers from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 27: Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks at a packed news conference at the U.S. Attorneys Office of the Eastern District of New York following the early morning arrest of world soccer figures, including officials of FIFA, for racketeering, bribery, money laundering and fraud on May 27, 2015 in New York City. The morning arrests took place at a hotel where FIFA members were attending a meeting for the world governing body of soccer (football) in Switzerland. The Justice Department unsealed a 47 count indictment early Wednesday charging 14 world soccer figures. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Costa Rican Football Federation acting President Jorge Hidalgo speaks during a press conference on May 27, 2015, in Lindora, 20 km west of San Jose, about the capture of Costa Rican Football Federation President Eduardo Li and six executives of FIFA in Zurich, Switzerland. AFP PHOTO / Ezequiel BECERRA (Photo credit should read EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)
US Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announces charges against FIFA officials at a news conference on May 27, 2015 in New York. The soccer officials arrested on Wednesday in an investigation into the FIFA governing body have corrupted the international game, Lynch said Wednesday. She spoke after Swiss authorities acting on the US indictments detained several FIFA leaders in a dawn raid in Zurich as part of a corruption probe that has rocked the sport's governing body. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio arrives to give a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio gives a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio gives a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
A staff waits prior to a press conference at the FIFA heaquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA Director of Communications Walter de Gregorio attends a press conference at the FIFA headquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA football officials as part of a US investigation. (Photo by Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images)
FIFA Director of Communications Walter de Gregorio reacts during a press conference at the FIFA headquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA football officials as part of a US investigation. (Photo by Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images)
A man walks by the headquarters of the international soccer's top body FIFA in Zurich, on May 27, 2015. Swiss police raided the headquarters of FIFA in Zurich, seizing documents and data, the Swiss attorney-general's office said. The raids were part of an investigation already underway into money laundering and fraud involving FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups to Russia and Qatar respectively, a statement said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
A cloud is seen above the headquarters of international soccer's top body FIFA, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss policeraided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
A woman walks by a logo of international soccer's top body FIFA, on May 27, 2015 at the organization's headquarters in Zurich. Swiss policeraided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
Media gathers outside the Hotel Baur-au-Lac where Swiss authorities conducted an early morning operation on May 27, 2015 to arrest several top soccer officials and extradite them to the United States on federal corruption charges. FIFA said it was seeking to clarify the situation after six football officials were arrested in Zurich on the request of US authorities, suspected of receiving bribes worth millions of dollars. (Photo credit AFP/Getty Images)
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Jose Maria Marin, Brazil

He was the president of the Brazilian soccer confederation from 2012 until April. He remains a vice president. He was the president of the 2014 World Cup organizing committee and is a member of the FIFA organizing committee for the Olympic football tournament at the 2016 Rio Games.

The 83-year-old Marin, a career politician, made headlines in 2012 when he was captured by TV cameras putting a winner's medal in his pocket during an under-18 championship. Marin was never accused of any wrongdoing by organizers and said the medal was given to him.

He took over the Brazilian confederation from embattled official Ricardo Teixeira, whose contentious 23-year stint in charge of the sport in Brazil ended amid allegations that he took kickbacks from former FIFA marketing partner ISL in the 1990s.

A former lawyer and player for Brazilian club Sao Paulo, Marin became Sao Paulo state governor in 1982 and ran for Sao Paulo mayor in 2000. He presided over the Sao Paulo state soccer federation for nearly five years in the 1980s, and was Brazil's chief of delegation at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico.

The newly built headquarters of the Brazilian confederation in Rio de Janeiro is named after Marin.

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Eduardo Li, Costa Rica

He is a member-elect of the FIFA executive committee and a member of CONCACAF's executive committee. He has been the president of the Costa Rica soccer federation since 2007.

A civil engineer and son of Chinese immigrants, Li became involved in football in 2004 after buying the franchise of a first-division club.

He has been credited with some of the recent successes of Costa Rica, including the national team's appearance in the quarterfinals of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

Costa Rica authorities have already opened an investigation against Li.

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Julio Rocha, Nicaragua

He is a FIFA development officer, and a former president of the Central American Football Union and the Nicaraguan soccer federation.

The 64-year-old Rocha was head of Nicaraguan soccer for nearly three decades before leaving in 2012, when FIFA hired him to be in charge of the sport's development in Mexico and Central America.

He was criticized locally for not promoting significant improvement to Nicaraguan soccer despite his several years as head of the federation, as well as for taking six years to build a local stadium estimated to cost $32 million, of which $1.2 million came from FIFA.

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Rafael Esquivel, Venezuela

He is a vice president of CONMEBOL and the president of the Venezuelan soccer federation since 1988.

The 68-year-old official, a former player, has faced numerous allegations of wrongdoing in his administration but has never been found guilty.

In 2005, FIFA threatened to leave Venezuela out of the 2006 World Cup qualifying tournament because of an internal dispute between federation members. Some of them went to court, which is against FIFA regulations, putting the national team's participation in doubt. The dispute was settled after the lawsuits were dropped.

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Costas Takkas, Britain

He is an assistant to CONCACAF President Jeffrey Webb, and the former general secretary of the Cayman Islands Football Association.

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