Queen of England's frustrated Windsor Castle staff to vote on taking action

Queen Of England's Frustrated Windsor Castle Staff To Vote On Taking Action

Staff members employed by the Queen of England and working at Windsor Castle are frustrated by their sub-living wage pay and will soon vote on whether or not they will take action.

The Guardian reported that, "More than 100 low-paid staff at Windsor Castle are due to be balloted from Tuesday in a dispute about leading guided tours, the Public and Commercial Services Union, union [PCS] said."

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Queen Elizabeth II and Buckingham Palace through the years
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Queen of England's frustrated Windsor Castle staff to vote on taking action
LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 27: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leave Buckingham Palace in the Diamond Jubilee State Coach to travel to the Houses of Parliament for the State Opening on May 27, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 27: Queen Elizabeth II leaves Buckingham Palace in the Diamond Jubilee State Coach to travel to the Houses of Parliament for the State Opening on May 27, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) walks to meet guests at a garden party held at Buckingham Palace, central London on May 12, 2015. AFP PHOTO / POOL /John Stillwell (Photo credit should read JOHN STILLWELL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 13: Prince George of Cambridge is held by Prince William, Duke of Cambridge as Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry and Queen Elizabeth II look out on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the Trooping the Colour on June 13, 2015 in London, England. . The ceremony is Queen Elizabeth II's annual birthday parade and dates back to the time of Charles II in the 17th Century when the Colours of a regiment were used as a rallying point in battle. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (R) ride in The Queen's Carriage during the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour,' from Buckingham Palace to Horse Guards Parade in London on June 13, 2015. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) arrives back at Buckingham Palace from Horse Guards Parade in a horse-drawn carriage preceeded and followed by marching guardsmen and other members of the royal family including Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (CL) riding beside the arriage during the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour,' in London on June 13, 2015. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 9: Queen Elizabeth II receives The Ambassador of Georgia Dr Revaz Gachechiladze and Mrs Mzia Marsagishvili as he presents his Letter of Credence at Buckingham Palace on December 9, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Anthony Devlin - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
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The services they may pull involve those they're currently performing for free, including giving tours of the property. At present, their annual financial compensation for the regular duties is the equivalent of approximately $20,000 US dollars per year.

Last year, a pay increase that was considered 'unsatisfactory' was accepted on the condition that compensation for the extra, unpaid work would be considered. When the time to renegotiate came, the additional money for those activities was denied.

Now, the 120 of the 200 staff members who are members of the union will decide if they're going to do the work at all.

PCS posted the following remarks from general secretary Mark Serwotka: "These workers are loyal to their employer and absolutely committed to ensuring visitors are given the royal treatment. It is scandalous that staff are so appallingly paid and expected to do work for free that brings in money for the royal family."

He noted that voting will begin on March 31st, and will close on April 14th. The PCS will then take action, if necessary, at the end of April.

The Royal Collection Trust, which manages the Queen's castles, said that the wage currently being paid is in line with market medians. Additionally, the Truth noted that those who do the extra duties do so voluntarily, and no one is forced to participate in the goodwill programs.

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