Co-pilot may have hidden illness, German prosecutors say

Crash Co-Pilot Properties Raided

MONTABAUR, Germany (AP) -- Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz appears to have hidden evidence of an illness from his employers, including having been excused by a doctor from work the day he crashed a passenger plane into a mountain, prosecutors said Friday.

The evidence came from the search of Lubitz's homes in two German cities for an explanation of why he crashed the Airbus A320 into the French Alps, killing all 150 people on board.

Prosecutors didn't say what type of illness - mental or physical - Lubitz may have been suffering from. German media reported Friday that the 27-year-old had received treatment for depression.

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Co-pilot may have hidden illness, German prosecutors say
People load remains of the Germanwings flight crash victims in a Lufthansa cargo plane on June 9, 2015 at the Marseille-Provence airport in Marignane, southern France. Lufthansa confirmed that a plane would arrive from Marseille in Duesseldorf on June 9 with 30 coffins of victims on board, and that their handover would take place the following day. 150 people died on March 24 when a Germanwings flight was deliberately crashed into the French Alps . AFP PHOTO /ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A screen grab taken from an AFP TV video on March 24, 2015 shows debris of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the crash site in the French Alps above the southeastern town of Seyne. The plane, which had taken off from Barcelona in Spain and was headed for Dusseldorf in Germany, crashed earlier in the day with 150 people onboard. AFP PHOTO /DENIS BOIS /GRIPMEDIA / AFP TV (Photo credit should read DENIS BOIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Marseille, France - March 24: A piece of debris of Germanwings Flight 4U9525 with german flag on it is seen at the crash site in the French Alps on March 24, 2015 near Barcelonette, France. (Photo by Thomas Koehler/Photothek via Getty Images)
A screengrab taken from an AFP TV video on March 24, 2015 shows the debris from a Germanwings Airbus A320 at the crash site in the French Alps above the southeastern town of Seyne. The plane, which had taken off from Barcelona in Spain and was headed for Dusseldorf in Germany, crashed earlier in the day with 150 people onboard. AFP PHOTO /DENIS BOIS /GRIPMEDIA / AFP TV (Photo credit should read DENIS BOIS/AFP/Getty Images)
LE VERNET, FRANCE- MARCH 26: French police close the road the road that leads up to the crash site as families of the victims are expected to start arriving in Le Vernet and Seylnes-les Alpes, on March 26, 2015 in Le Vernet, France. Germanwings flight 4U9525 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf crashed in Southern French Alps, killing all 150 passengers and crew. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
SEYNE, FRANCE - MARCH 25: French military personel walk up the mountainside on March 25, 2015 near Seyne, France. Germanwings flight 4U9525 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf has crashed in Southern French Alps. All 150 passengers and crew are thought to have died. (Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
A rescuers points to the plane crash site onto a map, on March 24, 2015 at the Rescue Command Center set up in the southeastern French town of Seyne, near the site where a German Airbus A320 of the low-cost carrier Germanwings crashed, killing all 150 people on board. The jet had taken off from Barcelona in Spain and was headed for Duesseldorf in Germany. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
French Red Cross staff wait to greet the families of victims of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the convention centre of Digne-les-Bains on March 25, 2015, a day after the plane crashed in the French Alps. Investigators scoured the pulverised debris of the German airliner for bodies and clues to its mysterious eight-minute descent and crash in the French Alps that killed all 150 aboard. AFP PHOTO / PASCAL GUYOT (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash in the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Aerial view of crash site of Germanwings Flight 4U9525 in Seyne Les Alpes on March 24, 2015 in Seyne Les Alpes, France. German Foreign Minister Steinmeier visited the site of a Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner which crashed with 150 people on board in the French Alps. (Photo by Michael Gottschalk/Photothek via Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: French Ecology Minister Segolene Royal,Spanish Transport Minister Ana Pastor Julian and German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash in the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve arrives near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: TV lighting is seen near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Gendarmerie and French mountain rescue teams arrive near the site of the Germanwings plane crash near the French Alps on March 24, 2015 in La Seyne les Alpes, France. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)
LA SEYNE LES ALPES, FRANCE- MARCH 24: Aerial view of crash site of Germanwings Flight 4U9525 in Seyne Les Alpes on March 24, 2015 in Seyne Les Alpes, France. German Foreign Minister Steinmeier visited the site of a Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner which crashed with 150 people on board in the French Alps. (Photo by Michael Gottschalk/Photothek via Getty Images)
A helicopter of the French civil security services flies near Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps. A German airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps on March 24, killing all 150 people on board, in the worst plane disaster in mainland France in four decades.. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - MARCH 24: Relatives of passengers of Germanwings flight, arrive at Barcelona International Airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain after an Airbus A320 plane flown by low-budget airline Germanwings crashed in southern France. Nearly 150 people are feared dead including 144 passengers and six crew after the Airbus A320 crash. (Photo by Albert Llop/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
HALTERN AM SEE, GERMANY - MARCH 24: Students and well wishers gather in front of the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, Germany on March 24, 2015, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. Sixteen German teenagers and two teachers on a school exchange trip were assumed to be among the 150 dead in the crash of a passenger jet in the French Alps, officials said. The head of low-budget airline Germanwings said there were 144 passengers and six crew on the Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona. (Photo by Sascha Steinbach/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - MARCH 24: Relatives of passengers of Germanwings flight, arrive at Barcelona International Airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain after an Airbus A320 plane flown by low-budget airline Germanwings crashed in southern France. (Photo by Albert Llop/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Flightradar data of flight D-AIPX operated by Germanwings. An Airbus A320 of the German airline Germanwings crashed Tuesday in Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Southern France, on March 24, 2015, BFMTV reported, citing a local police source. The ill-fated passenger jet with some 142 passengers and six crew members aboard was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf when the tragedy occurred. Photo by ABACAPRESS.COM
French emergency services workers gather in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps. A German airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps on March 24, killing all 150 people on board, in the worst plane disaster in mainland France in four decades. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Thomas Winkelmann, chief executive officer of Germanwings, speaks during a news conference in Cologne, Germany, on Tuesday, March 24, 2015. Germanwings Flight 9525 operated by the low-cost subsidiary of Deutsche Lufthansa AG went down in the Digne region about an hour north of Marseille en route from Barcelona to Dusseldorf, Germany, according to German air-traffic control authorities and may have claimed the lives of all 154 people on board. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An Aerospatiale AS350 Ecureuil helicopter of the French National Gendarmerie is seen in Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps. A German airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps on March 24, killing all 150 people on board, in the worst plane disaster in mainland France in four decades. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A helicopter of the French civil security services flies near Seyne, south-eastern France, on March 24, 2015, near the site where a Germanwings Airbus A320 crashed in the French Alps. A German airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps on March 24, killing all 150 people on board, in the worst plane disaster in mainland France in four decades. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 24: King Felipe of Spain (R) is watched by French president Francois Hollande (L) and Queen Letizia of Spain as he addresses media after a meeting at the Elysee presidential palace, on March 24, 2015 in Paris, France. King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain have decided to cut short their scheduled state visit to France after a Germanwings Airbus A320 plane crashed in the French Alps, as it travelled from Barcelona to Duesseldorf. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - MARCH 24: A relative (C) of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrives at the Terminal 2 of the Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 148 people on board has crashed in French Alps. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN- MARCH 24: Relatives of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrive escorted by police officer at Terminal 2 of Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 148 people on board has crashed in French Alps. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
Flightradar data of flight D-AIPX operated by Germanwings. An Airbus A320 of the German airline Germanwings crashed Tuesday in Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Southern France, on March 24, 2015, BFMTV reported, citing a local police source. The ill-fated passenger jet with some 142 passengers and six crew members aboard was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf when the tragedy occurred. Photo by ABACAPRESS.COM
BARCELONA, SPAIN - MARCH 24: A relative (C) of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrives at the Terminal 2 of the Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. A Germanwings Airbus A320 airliner with 148 people on board has crashed in French Alps. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
Duesseldorf, GERMANY - MARCH 24: People arrive at a holding area for friends and relatives of passengers on Germanwings flight 4U9525 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf at Duesseldorf International Airport on March 24, 2015 in Duesseldorf, Germany. The German Airbus A320 has crashed in Southern French Alps. (Photo by Sascha Steinbach/Getty Images)
Flightradar data of flight D-AIPX operated by Germanwings. An Airbus A320 of the German airline Germanwings crashed Tuesday in Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Southern France, on March 24, 2015, BFMTV reported, citing a local police source. The ill-fated passenger jet with some 142 passengers and six crew members aboard was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf when the tragedy occurred. Photo by ABACAPRESS.COM
An electronic board displays departures in terminal 2B at Barcelona's El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 after a Germanwings airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps with all 148 people on board feared dead, officials said. The plane, belonged to Germanwings, a low-cost affiliate of German airline Lufthansa, was travelling from the Spanish coastal city of Barcelona to the German city of Duesseldorf after issuing a distress call at 10:47 am (0947 GMT), sources said. AFP PHOTO / LLUIS GENE (Photo credit should read LLUIS GENE/AFP/Getty Images)
An Airbus A320 of the German airline Germanwings crashed Tuesday in Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Southern France, on March 24, 2015, BFMTV reported, citing a local police source. The ill-fated passenger jet with some 142 passengers and six crew members aboard was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf when the tragedy occurred. Photo by ABACAPRESS.COM
A red star on a topographical map marks the crash site of a Germanwings plane in the French Alps in Seyne Les Alpes, France, 24 March 2015. (Photo: PETER KNEFFEL/dpa)
A Swissport employee stands inside a booth in terminal 2B at Barcelona's El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 after a Germanwings airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps with all 148 people on board feared dead, officials said. The plane, belonged to Germanwings, a low-cost affiliate of German airline Lufthansa, was travelling from the Spanish coastal city of Barcelona to the German city of Duesseldorf after issuing a distress call at 10:47 am (0947 GMT), sources said. AFP PHOTO / LLUIS GENE (Photo credit should read LLUIS GENE/AFP/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - MARCH 24: Relatives of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrives at the Terminal 2 of the Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Germanwings flight 4U9525 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps.(Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN- MARCH 24: Relatives of passangers of the Germanwings plane crashed in French Alps arrives at the Terminal 2 of the Barcelona El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Germanwings flight 4U9525 from Barcelona to Duesseldorf with 150 people on board has crashed in the French Alps.(Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
HALTERN AM SEE, GERMANY - MARCH 24: Students and well wishers gather in front of the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, Germany on March 24, 2015, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. Sixteen German teenagers and two teachers on a school exchange trip were assumed to be among the 150 dead in the crash of a passenger jet in the French Alps, officials said. The head of low-budget airline Germanwings said there were 144 passengers and six crew on the Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona. (Photo by Sascha Steinbach/Getty Images)
HALTERN AM SEE, GERMANY - MARCH 24: Students and well wishers gather in front of the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, Germany on March 24, 2015, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. Sixteen German teenagers and two teachers on a school exchange trip were assumed to be among the 150 dead in the crash of a passenger jet in the French Alps, officials said. The head of low-budget airline Germanwings said there were 144 passengers and six crew on the Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona. (Photo by Sascha Steinbach/Getty Images)
Family member aircrash victims stand at Barcelona's El Prat airport on March 24, 2015 after a Germanwings airliner crashed near a ski resort in the French Alps with all 150 people on board feared dead, officials said. Tearful relatives of passengers of the German airliner that crashed in the French Alps Tuesday gathered grieving at Barcelona and Dusseldorf airports as officials announced none of the 150 people on board survived. AFP PHOTO / LLUIS GENE (Photo credit should read LLUIS GENE/AFP/Getty Images)
Students and well wishers gather in front of the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, western Germany on March 24, 2015, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. Sixteen German teenagers and two teachers on a school exchange trip were assumed to be among the 150 dead in the crash of a passenger jet in the French Alps, officials said. The head of low-budget airline Germanwings said there were 144 passengers and six crew on the Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona. AFP PHOTO / SASCHA SCHUERMANN (Photo credit should read SASCHA SCHUERMANN/AFP/Getty Images)
Young girls stand on March 24, 2015 in front of the Joseph-Koenig-Gymnasium secondary school in Haltern am See, western Germany, from where some of the Germanwings plane crash victims came. Sixteen German teenagers and two teachers on a school exchange trip were assumed to be among the 150 dead in the crash of a passenger jet in the French Alps, officials said. The head of low-budget airline Germanwings said there were 144 passengers and six crew on the Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps en route to Duesseldorf from Barcelona. AFP PHOTO / SASCHA SCHUERMANN ALTERNATIVE CROP (Photo credit should read SASCHA SCHUERMANN/AFP/Getty Images)
A mourning band is fixed at the town sign of Haltern am See, western Germany, where 18 passengers of the crashed Germanwings flight 4U-9525 came from on March 26, 2015. The crash of the budget airline Germanwings flight on March 24, 2015 in the French Alps, killed all 150 people aboard. The probe has focused on the co-pilot, after it was revealed the he initiated the fatal descent and refused to open the door to the pilot. AFP PHOTO / DPA / ROLF VENNENBERND GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read ROLF VENNENBERND/AFP/Getty Images)
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Duesseldorf prosecutors' office spokesman Ralf Herrenbrueck said in a written statement that torn-up sick notes for the day of the crash "support the current preliminary assessment that the deceased hid his illness from his employer and colleagues."

Such sick notes from doctors excusing employees from work are common in Germany and issued even for minor illnesses.

Herrenbrueck said other medical documents found indicated "an existing illness and appropriate medical treatment," but that no suicide note was found. He added there was no indication of any political or religious motivation for Lubitz's actions.

Germanwings and its parent company Lufthansa declined immediately to comment on the new information.

Investigators had removed multiple boxes of items from Lubitz's apartment in Duesseldorf and his parents' house in Montabaur, near Frankfurt.

A German aviation official told The Associated Press that Lubitz's file at the country's Federal Aviation Office contained an "SIC" note, meaning that he needed "specific regular medical examination." Such a note could refer to either a physical or mental condition, but the official - who spoke only on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to release the information, said the note does not specify which.

However, neighbors described a man whose physical health was superb.

"He definitely did not smoke. He really took care of himself. He always went jogging. I am not sure whether he did marathons, but he was very healthy," said Johannes Rossmann, who lived a few doors down from Lubitz's home in Montabaur.

German news media painted a picture of a man with a history of depression who had received psychological treatment, and who may have been set off by a falling out with his girlfriend. Duesseldorf prosecutors, who are leading the German side of the probe, refused to comment on the anonymously sourced reports, citing the ongoing investigation.

Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr said there was a "several-month" gap in Lubitz's training six years ago, but would not elaborate. Following the disruption, he said, Lubitz "not only passed all medical tests but also his flight training, all flying tests and checks."

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration had issued Lubitz a third-class medical certificate. In order to obtain such a certificate, a pilot must be cleared of psychological problems including psychosis, bipolar disorder and personality disorder "that is severe enough to have repeatedly manifested itself by overt acts."

The certificate also means that he wasn't found to be suffering from another mental health condition that "makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges" of a pilot's license.

Experts say it's possible that someone with mental health problems could have hidden them from employers or a doctor without specialist training.

"It's a high-stakes situation for pilots because they know if they give the wrong answer, they could lose their license," said Dr. Raj Persaud, fellow of Britain's Royal College of Psychiatrists. "A very good psychologist or psychiatrist who spends in-depth time with him would be able to pick up (a problem), but you have to throw an awful lot of resources at it to do that and often, I don't think (pilots) are getting in-depth assessments," Persaud said.

The president of the German pilots union Cockpit said medical checkups are done by certified doctors and take place once a year.

"At the moment all the evidence points clearly in one direction and it's the most likely scenario, there's no doubt about that," Ilja Schulz told The Associated Press. "But all the pieces must be put together to see whether there were any other factors that played a role, or not. Only then can you draw lessons that will improve security in future."

French investigators, who are in charge of the probe into the plane crash, believe the 27-year-old locked himself inside the cockpit and then intentionally smashed the Germanwings plane into a mountainside on Tuesday during a flight from Barcelona to Duesseldorf.

People in Montabaur who knew Lubitz told AP they were shocked at the allegations that he could have intentionally crashed the plane, saying he had been thrilled with his job at Germanwings and seemed to be "very happy."

Germanwings, a low-cost carrier in the Lufthansa Group, said it was setting up a family assistance center in Marseille for relatives of those killed in the crash.

"In these dark hours our full attention belongs to the emotional support of the relatives and friends of the victims of Flight 9525," Germanwings CEO Thomas Winkelmann said in a statement.

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