Pharrell speaks out after 'Blurred Lines' verdict, Gaye family pens open letter

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Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke Lose 'Blurred Lines' Case and More


Pharrell Williams is speaking out for the first time since a federal court ruled that he and Robin Thicke owe Marvin Gaye's estate over $7 million for infringing the copyright of Gaye's song "Got to Give It Up" with the similarities in their hit single "Blurred Lines."

NEWS: Marvin Gaye's Family Awarded More Than $7 Million in 'Blurred Lines' Trial

"The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else," Williams told the Financial Times. "This applies to fashion, music, design . . . anything. If we lose our freedom to be inspired we're going to look up one day and the entertainment industry as we know it will be frozen in litigation. This is about protecting the intellectual rights of people who have ideas."

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Blurred Lines Court Case (Robin Thicke, Pharrell, TI, Marvin Gaye)
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Pharrell speaks out after 'Blurred Lines' verdict, Gaye family pens open letter
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 30: (L-R) Recording artists Pharrell Williams, T.I., and Robin Thicke perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images for BET)
After winning a major victory in court over the song "Blurred Lines," Marvin Gaye's family sat down with ET's Nischelle Turner to talk about what the court decision means to them.
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 04: Musician Robin Thicke is seen outside the Roybal Federal Building on March 4, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. Thicke and co-writers of the song 'Blurred Lines' are being sued by the children of singer Marvin Gaye for using elements of Gaye's song 'Got to Give it Up' in 'Blurred Lines.' (Photo by David Buchan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 04: Musician Pharrell Williams is seen outside the Roybal Federal Building on March 4, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. Williams and co-writers of the song 'Blurred Lines' are being sued by the children of singer Marvin Gaye for using elements of Gaye's song 'Got to Give it Up' in 'Blurred Lines.' (Photo by David Buchan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 04: Musician Pharrell Williams is seen outside the Roybal Federal Building on March 4, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. Williams and co-writers of the song 'Blurred Lines' are being sued by the children of singer Marvin Gaye for using elements of Gaye's song 'Got to Give it Up' in 'Blurred Lines.' (Photo by David Buchan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MARCH 04: Musician Robin Thicke is seen outside the Roybal Federal Building on March 4, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. Thicke and co-writers of the song 'Blurred Lines' are being sued by the children of singer Marvin Gaye for using elements of Gaye's song 'Got to Give it Up' in 'Blurred Lines.' (Photo by David Buchan/Getty Images)
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - JANUARY 25: Recording artists Pharrell Williams, Robin Thicke and T.I. perform onstage during the 56th annual GRAMMY Awards Pre-GRAMMY Gala and Salute to Industry Icons honoring Lucian Grainge at The Beverly Hilton on January 25, 2014 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS)
BEVERLY HILLS, CA - JANUARY 25: Pharrell Williams, Robin Thicke, and T.I. perform onstage during the 56th annual GRAMMY Awards Pre-GRAMMY Gala and Salute to Industry Icons honoring Lucian Grainge at The Beverly Hilton on January 25, 2014 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 30: (L-R) Recording artists Pharrell, T. I., and Robin Thicke perform onstage during the 2013 BET Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on June 30, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for BET)
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"Blurred Lines" was one of the biggest hits of the summer of 2013, generating nearly $17 million in profits, according to court documents. The federal verdict seems to set a legal precedent for copyright infringement, as the songs have different chords and note progression, despite having a similar "feel."

"There was no infringement," Williams protested. "You can't own feelings and you can't own emotions...[in music] there are only the notations and the progression. Those were different."

VIDEO: How Thicke Knew 'Blurred Lines' Would Be Huge

The Gaye family also penned an open letter in the wake of the verdict, thanking fans for their support during the trial.

"We want to extend our deepest appreciation and gratitude for the outpouring of love and support we have received from all of our father's fans and friends, as well as artists and industry folks who contacted us surrounding the recent events concerning his song, 'Got to Give It Up,'" reads the statement. "Your kindness and encouragement gave us incredible strength and perseverance. We are so incredibly grateful for your support as well as the hard work and dedication of our amazing legal team and experts. We thank you all."

VIDEO: Marvin Gaye's Son Talks 'Blurred Lines' Lawsuit

The family also dismissed rumors that they were contemplating further claims against Williams for his hit single "Happy."

"This is 100% false," the family said. "We have absolutely no claim whatsoever concerning 'Happy.'"

EXCLUSIVE: After 'Blurred Lines' Victory, Gaye Family Talks Emotional Verdict, 'Happy' Similarities

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