2 suspected accomplices deny helping Copenhagen gunman

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Copenhagen 2nd shooting - updated 2/15 -- vid leads
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2 suspected accomplices deny helping Copenhagen gunman
The suspect of the shootings in Copenhagen that occurred this weekend, was known to be involved with criminal gangs, had a violent past and was recently released from jail.
Policemen secure the area around a building in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired on February 14, 2015 outside the venue of a debate held on Islam and free speech. According to Danish media, the French ambassador to Denmark attended the discussion. Unidentified assailants fired on a building where the debate was being held, the French ambassdor to Denmark told AFP from inside the venue. Reports said that Swedish artist Lars Vilks, the author of controversial Prophet Mohammed cartoons published in 2007 that sparked worldwide protests, was also at the debate. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN SYLVEST / SCANPIX DENMARK +++ DENMARK OUT (Photo credit should read MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Policemen secure the area around a building in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired on February 14, 2015 outside the venue of a debate held on Islam and free speech. According to Danish media, the French ambassador to Denmark attended the discussion. Unidentified assailants fired on a building where the debate was being held, the French ambassdor to Denmark told AFP from inside the venue. Reports said that Swedish artist Lars Vilks, the author of controversial Prophet Mohammed cartoons published in 2007 that sparked worldwide protests, was also at the debate. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN SYLVEST / SCANPIX DENMARK +++ DENMARK OUT (Photo credit should read MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Policemen secure the area around a building in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired on February 14, 2015 outside the venue of a debate held on art, blasphemy and free speech. According to Danish media, the French ambassador to Denmark attended the discussion. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK +++ DENMARK OUT (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
Policemen secure the area around a building in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired on February 14, 2015 outside the venue of a debate held on art, blasphemy and free speech. According to Danish media, the French ambassador to Denmark attended the discussion. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK +++ DENMARK OUT (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
Policemen secure the area around a building in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired on February 14, 2015 outside the venue of a debate held on art, blasphemy and free speech. According to Danish media, the French ambassador to Denmark attended the discussion. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK +++ DENMARK OUT (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
Forensic police officers work at the area around a cultural centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired during a debate on Islam and free speech on February 14, 2015. Unidentified gunmen killed at least one person and wounded several police officers after opening fire in what French authorities call 'a terrorist attack'. France's ambassador to Denmark Francois Zimeray, who was attending the debate, told AFP the attackers were seeking to replicate the January 7 assault by jihadists in Paris on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead. AFP PHOTO / CLAUS BJORN LARSEN (Photo credit should read CLAUS BJORN LARSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Prime Minister Helle Thorning Schmidt speaks to journalists at a cultural centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired during a debate on Islam and free speech on February 14, 2015. Unidentified gunmen killed at least one person and wounded several police officers after opening fire in what French authorities call 'a terrorist attack'. France's ambassador to Denmark Francois Zimeray, who was attending the debate, told AFP the attackers were seeking to replicate the January 7 assault by jihadists in Paris on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead. AFP PHOTO / CLAUS BJORN LARSEN (Photo credit should read CLAUS BJORN LARSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
The first flowers have been laid at the corner of Gunner Nu Hansens Plads and Per Henrik Ling alle after a shooting attack at a cultural centre in Kanonhallen in Oesterbro, a district of Copenhagen, Denmark, where shots were fired during a debate on Islam and free speech on February 14, 2015. Unidentified gunmen killed at least one person and wounded several police officers after opening fire in what French authorities call 'a terrorist attack'. France's ambassador to Denmark Francois Zimeray, who was attending the debate, told AFP the attackers were seeking to replicate the January 7 assault by jihadists in Paris on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK / MARTIN SYLVEST +++ DENMARK OUT +++ (Photo credit should read MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Emergency services personnel stand behind a police cordon on February 15, 2015, close to Norrebro station where the alleged offender of a terrorist attack, was killed. In a first attack, a 55-year-old man was killed at a panel discussion about Islam and free speech on Saturday attended by the Swedish cartoonist behind controversial caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed. In a second attack, a Jewish man was killed and two police officers were wounded outside Copenhagen's main synagogue early Sunday. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK / MARTIN SYLVEST (Photo credit should read MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - FEBRUARY 15: Danish policemen arrest an drunk man shortly after a shooting near a synagogue in central Copenhagen, Denmark on 15 February 2015 after one person was shot in the head and two policemen were shot in the arm and leg in Krystalgade, a street that is home to Copenhagen's main synagogue. (Photo by Freya Ingrid Morales/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - FEBRUARY 15: A policeman inform tourist about the situation and instruct them around the police cordon near Norreport Train Station on February 15, 2015 after one person was shot in the head and two policemen were shot in the arm and leg in Krystalgade, a street that is home to Copenhagen's main synagogue. (Photo by Freya Ingrid Morales/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Police officers take cover behind their patrol cars on the streets of central Copenhagen on February 15, 2015 after one person was shot in the head and two policemen were shot in the arm and leg in Krystalgade, a street that is home to Copenhagen's main synagogue. It was not confirmed if the incident was related to Saturday's deadly shooting at a cultural centre in Copenhagen where a debate on Islam and free speech was being held. AFP PHOTO / SCANPIX DENMARK / MARTIN SYLVEST +++ DENMARK OUT +++ (Photo credit should read MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - FEBRUARY 15: Danish policemen arrest an drunk man shortly after a shooting near a synagogue in central Copenhagen, Denmark on 15 February 2015 after one person was shot in the head and two policemen were shot in the arm and leg in Krystalgade, a street that is home to Copenhagen's main synagogue. (Photo by Freya Ingrid Morales/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) - Two men suspected of helping the gunman behind the deadly attacks in Copenhagen faced a court hearing Monday as Danes mourned the victims of a shooting spree that authorities said may have been inspired by last month's terror attacks in Paris.

The defense lawyer for one of the suspects said they were accused of helping the gunman evade authorities and get rid of a weapon during the manhunt that ended early Sunday when the attacker was killed in a shootout with police.

Two people were killed in the weekend attacks, including a Danish filmmaker attending a free speech event and a Jewish security guard shot in the head outside a synagogue in Copenhagen. Five police officers were wounded in the attacks.

Authorities described the gunman as a 22-year-old Dane with a history of violence and gang connections. Denmark's security service said he may have been inspired by the terror attacks by Islamic extremists in Paris that killed 17 people.

Denmark's red-and-white flag flew at half-staff from official buildings Monday across the capital. Mourners placed flowers and candles at the cultural center where documentary filmmaker Finn Noergaard, 55, was killed and at the synagogue where Dan Uzan, a 37-year-old security guard, was gunned down.

There was also a smaller mound of flowers on the street at the location were the gunman was slain.

The prime ministers of Denmark and Sweden were expected to join thousands of people at memorials in Copenhagen on Monday evening.

The two suspected accomplices arraigned at a closed hearing Monday were accused of "having helped the perpetrator in connection with the shooting attacks," Copenhagen police said.

Michael Juul Eriksen, the defense attorney for one of the two men, told reporters they deny allegations of giving the gunman shelter and getting rid of a weapon. A judge at the hearing will rule on whether to keep the two men in custody.

Denmark has been targeted by a series of foiled terror plots since the 2005 publication of 12 caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in the Jyllands-Posten newspaper. The cartoons triggered riots in many Muslim countries and militant Islamists called for vengeance.

One of the participants in the free speech event targeted Saturday was Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who caricatured the prophet in 2007. Vilks, who was whisked away by his bodyguards and was unharmed, told The Associated Press he thought he was the intended target of that attack.

Other participants said they dropped to the floor, looking for places to hide as the shooting started. The gunman never entered the cultural center but sprayed it with bullets from outside in a gun battle with police.

World leaders, including British Prime Minister David Cameron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, condemned the Copenhagen attacks.

French President Francois Hollande visited the Danish Embassy in Paris on Sunday and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo was in Copenhagen on Monday in a show of solidarity.

"The terrorist attacks have the same causes in Paris and Copenhagen," Hidalgo said. "Our cities are symbols of democracy, Paris and Copenhagen. We are here and we are not afraid."

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AP journalist Philipp-Moritz Jenne contributed to this report.


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