Shoeless Joe autograph could fetch $100,000

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Shoeless Joe Autograph Could Fetch $100K

WYFF -- Shoeless Joe Jackson's autograph has been called the Holy Grail of baseball signatures.

Now perhaps the rarest example of the famed ballplayer's autograph has come up for auction and could fetch $100,000 later this month in New York City.

Dallas-based Heritage Auctions says it's the first signed photo of Jackson that has been authenticated by autograph experts.

Jackson is remembered for being banned from baseball after being accused of throwing the 1919 World Series and later depicted in the movies "Field of Dreams" and "Eight Men Out."

The century-old photo comes from a scrapbook that was in the hands of a Cleveland family and stored in a barn until recent years.

The ballplayer's autograph is among the scarcest in sports because he barely knew how to write his name and mostly signed paychecks and legal documents.

His great-great-great nephew, Joe Jackson, said all of his signatures varied slightly.

11 PHOTOS
Shoeless Joe autograph
See Gallery
Shoeless Joe autograph could fetch $100,000
American baseball players (from left) Ty Cobb (1886 - 1961) and 'Shoeless Joe' Jackson (1887 - 1951). Cobb was known as 'the Georgia Peach' and still holds the record lifetime batting average of .367. Jackson was banned from the sport in 1921 for his part in the 'Black Sox' scandal when he and seven of his teammates were accused of throwing the world series, causing a young boy to approach him after the trial and plead 'say it ain't so, Joe' (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
Aug 18, 2005; Chicago, IL, USA; (File Photo: Date Unknown) Pictured: Joe Jackson when he played for the Cleveland Indians. 'Shoeless'Joe Jackson and seven of his Chicago White Sox teammates were implicated in fixing the 1919 World Series and letting the Cincinnati Reds win. Jackson had a .375 in the series, 12 hits, no errors and hit the lone home run for the White Sox. The eight players were banned from baseball for life by Commissioner Kennesaw Mountain Landis. 'Shoeless Joe' died on 12/5/1951 just 10 days before he was scheduled to appear on Ed Sullivan's 'Talk of the Town: in an effort to clear his name. (Photo by Sporting News/Sporting News via Getty Images)
1919, Portrait of American baseball player 'Shoeless' Joe Jackson (1889 - 1951) wearing his Chicago White Sox hat. (Photo by APA/Getty Images)
Aug 18, 2005; Chicago, IL, USA; (File Photo: Date Unknown) 'Shoeless'Joe Jackson and seven of his Chicago White Sox teammates were implicated in fixing the 1919 World Series and letting the Cincinnati Reds win. Jackson had a .375 in the series, 12 hits, no errors and hit the lone home run for the White Sox. The eight players were banned from baseball for life by Commissioner Kennesaw Mountain Landis. 'Shoeless Joe' died on 12/5/1951 just 10 days before he was scheduled to appear on Ed Sullivan's 'Talk of the Town: in an effort to clear his name. (Photo by Sporting News/Sporting News via Getty Images)
Photo Credit: WYFF
Photo Credit: WYFF
Photo Credit: WYFF
Photo Credit: WYFF
Photo Credit: WYFF
Joe Jackson's baseball card in this Cracker Jack candy set was produced in Chicago Illinoi, circa 1913. (Photo by Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"He could write his name out but it would take him 10 minutes or so to do it. That's why it's so hard to authenticate his stuff because nothing was the same," Jackson said. "Anytime a Joe Jackson signature pops up, everybody wants it, everybody wants to see it. It's just really cool to find stuff from his era because they didn't have baseball cards and stuff like that."

Jackson said he is proud of his family's legacy and how Greenville has kept his great-great-great uncle's history prominent downtown.

"People of Greenville have been really great to the family, everything from the statue of Joe downtown to just keeping Joe's spirit alive downtown," Jackson said. "The spirit of him has stayed alive and its really awesome. I love when people come ask me about it and all that. I enjoy talking to them about it."

More on AOL:
Ohio family convinced son lived another life as a woman
'Antiques Roadshow:' Huge jade ring valued at over $60K
United States government spending millions to save Monarch butterfly

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners