Jordan launches new airstrikes after vowing harsh war on IS

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Jordan launches new airstrikes after vowing harsh war on IS
ISIS says American hostage Kayla Mueller died when Jordanian fighter jets bombed the militants' stronghold in Raqqa. The group hasn't given proof.
American aid worker and ISIS hostage Kayla Jean Mueller reportedly killed in coalition air strike. http://t.co/RO5B4YXa2M
This is Kayla Jean Mueller, the American female being held hostage by ISIS http://t.co/MOXLjNx8aa
Jordanian students shout slogans on February 5, 2015 in the capital Amman during a rally against the Islamic state (IS) group and in reaction to the burning alive of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh by the group's militants. Jordan said its warplanes had launched new strikes against the IS group, after vowing a harsh response to the fighter pilot murder. The placards show Jordan's King Abdullah II and Maaz al-Kassasbeh. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Jawdat al-Kassasbeh, the brother of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh, who was burned alive by Islamic state (IS) group's militants, flashes the sign of victory during a rally against IS group and in reaction to the pilot's murder on February 5, 2015 in the capital Amman. Jordan said its warplanes had launched new strikes against the IS group, after vowing a harsh response to the fighter pilot murder. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
Jordanian students shout slogans waving national flags on February 5, 2015 in the capital Amman during a rally against the Islamic state (IS) group and in reaction to the burning alive of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh (on the placards) by the group's militants. Jordan said its warplanes had launched new strikes against the IS group, after vowing a harsh response to the fighter pilot murder. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
AMMAN, JORDAN - FEBRUARY 4: Jordanians welcome King Abdullah as he arrives at Aliya Airport 30 kilometers from the capital Amman, Jordan on February 4, 2015. He has cut his visit to America short following the burning to death of Jordanian pilot Muaz el-Kesasibe by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Jordanians met King Abdullah with posters of the King and Jordanian flags on his arrival at Aliya Airport 30 kilometers from the capital Amman. (Photo by Salah Malkawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A Jordanian shouts slogans on February 5, 2015 in the capital Amman during a rally against the Islamic state (IS) group and in reaction to the burning alive of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh by the group's militants. Jordan said its warplanes had launched new strikes against the IS group, after vowing a harsh response to the fighter pilot murder. The placards show Jordan's King Abdullah II and Maaz al-Kassasbeh. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
A Jordanian student sits in front of a giant poster showing Jordan's King Abdullah II as he holds a placard bearing a portrait of late Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh on February 5, 2015 during a rally in the capital Amman against the Islamic state (IS) group after its militants burned alive the pilot. Jordan said its warplanes had launched new strikes against the IS group, after vowing a harsh response to the fighter pilot murder. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
Jordanian Muslim worshippers perform a prayer on February 4, 2015 in the capital Amman, for Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh, who was burnt alive by Islamic State (IS) group militants after they captured him when his jet crashed in northern Syria in December. The burning alive of the Jordanian pilot by the IS group has shocked the kingdom, where people are expected to rally behind a military campaign against the jihadists, experts say. AFP PHOTO / STR (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe attends the Lower House's budget committee session at the National Diet in Tokyo on February 4, 2015. Abe condemned the apparent execution by the Islamic State group of a Jordanian pilot as 'unforgivable', days after the murders of two Japanese hostages. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
(al-Furqan Media)
AMMAN, JORDAN - FEBRUARY 03: A group of people stage protest after a release of a video, allegedly shows execution of the Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh who has been held captive by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) forces, in Amman, Jordan on February 03, 2015. (Photo by Salah Malkawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
AMMAN, JORDAN - FEBRUARY 03: A group of people stage protest after a release of a video, allegedly shows execution of the Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh who has been held captive by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) forces, in Amman, Jordan on February 03, 2015. (Photo by Salah Malkawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
AMMAN, JORDAN - FEBRUARY 03:Angry Jordanians gather after after hearing the news of the execution of Jordanian pilot Muath Al Kasasbeh, at the Kasasbeh tribe society on February 3, 2015 in Amman, Jordan. Today a video was released depicting captured Jordanian pilot First Lieutenant Moaz al-Kasabeh being burned alive in a cage by the Islamic State (ISIS) group. (Photo by Jordan Pix/Getty Images)
AMMAN, JORDAN - FEBRUARY 03: A group of people stage protest after a release of a video, allegedly shows execution of the Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh who has been held captive by Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) forces, in Amman, Jordan on February 03, 2015. (Photo by Salah Malkawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Anwar Tarawneh (C), the wife of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh, who was captured by Islamic State (IS) group militants on December 24 after his F-16 jet crashed while on a mission against the jihadists over northern Syria, sheds a tear during a rally calling for the release of her captive husband in the Jordanian capital Amman on February 3, 2015. Jordan vowed to do all it could to save the pilot held by IS after the jihadists killed a Japanese journalist they had been holding. IS has been demanding the release of an Iraqi jihadist on death row in Jordan in exchange for Kassasbeh's life, and Amman said it would hand her over if given proof that he is still alive. AFP PHOTO / KHALIL MAZRAAWI (Photo credit should read KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AFP/Getty Images)
A screen grab from a video posted to YouTube by ISIS that claims to show journalist James Foley, who was abducted in 2012 while covering the Syria civil war, being beheaded.
Screen shot from an Internet video released Friday that purports to show an ISIS militant beheading British aid worker Alan Henning, who had been taken hostage by the extremist group.
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AMMAN, Jordan (AP) - Dozens of Jordanian fighter jets bombed Islamic State targets on Thursday, including training centers and weapons storage sites, the military said, pledging to keep up the attacks until the militants are defeated.

Jordan has said it would respond harshly to the killing of a captive Jordanian fighter pilot by the militants. Video released earlier this week showed the pilot being burned to death in a cage, setting off a wave of anger in Jordan and the region.

State TV showed footage of Thursday's strikes, including one that set off a large ball of fire after impact. It showed two pilots scribbling messages in chalk on the missiles.

"For you, the enemies of Islam," read one message.

The military said all targets were destroyed. The announcement did not say whether the strikes where carried out against Islamic State positions in Syria or Iraq. The IS militants control about one-third of each country.

Jordan joined the U.S.-led military alliance against the Islamic State group in September, but up to now is believed to have only bombed sites in Syria.

The statement, read on state TV, was entitled, "This is the beginning and you will get to know the Jordanians" - an apparent warning to IS. It said the strikes will continue "until we eliminate them."

Jordan's King Abdullah II was paying a condolence visit to the family of the pilot, Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, in southern Jordan when the fighter jets roared overhead.

The king pointed upward, toward the planes, as he sat next to the pilot's father, Safi al-Kaseasbeh.

Al-Kaseasbeh told the assembled mourners that the planes had returned from strikes over Raqqa, the de facto capital of the militants' self-declared caliphate. His son had been captured near Raqqa when his F-16 fighter plane went down in December.

Earlier this week, Islamic State displayed the video of the killing of the pilot on outdoor screens in Raqqa, to chants of "God is Great" from some in the audience, according to another video posted by the militants.

Also Thursday, Jordan released an influential jihadi cleric, Abu Mohammed al-Maqdesi, who was detained in October after speaking out against Jordan's participation in the anti-IS coalition, according to his lawyer, Moussa al-Abdallat.

Jordan's Islamic militants are split between supporters of Islamic State and Jabhat al-Nusra, the branch of al-Qaida in Syria.

Last year, al-Maqdesi had criticized Islamic State militants for attacking fellow Muslims. However, after Jordan joined the military coalition, he called on his website for Muslim unity against a "crusader war," a reference to coalition airstrikes.

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